10th Annual NaBITA Conference
and the 9th Annual NaBITA Campus Threat Management Institute

#NaBITA2018

November 5–9, 2018
The Westin Riverwalk, San Antonio
in San Antonio, TX

Registration for this event is currently open!


Please contact NaBITA at conference@nabita.org for questions.

A Message from the Conference Committee
Important Dates and Deadlines
2018 Conference Schedule

Conference Registration
Institute Registration
Opening Keynote Speaker and Session
Closing Keynote Speaker and Session
Pre-Conference Sessions
Welcome Session
Featured Speakers

Featured Speaker Sessions
Concurrent Speaker Sessions
Roundtable Discussions
2018 Campus Threat Management Institute
Scholarship Opportunity
Awards
Optional Networking Dinner
The Doctor Is In
Call for Programs
Conference Sponsor and Exhibitor Information
2018 NaBITA Annual Conference Sponsors and Exhibitors
Hotel
Airport and Ground Transportation
Guests with Special Needs
Refund Policy

A Message from the Conference Committee…

The Annual NaBITA Conference and Campus Threat Management Institute is the leading conference in the field of higher education threat assessment and behavioral intervention. Since our first Conference in 2009, we have provided a space for valuable, sustaining dialogue for professionals from various disciplines who are engaged in the essential function of behavioral intervention in schools, on college campuses, and in corporations and organizations.

This year, NaBITA will be celebrating its 10th annual conference, to be held at The Westin Riverwalk, San Antonio. Our Opening Keynote, Manny Tau, Psy.D., is a clinical and forensic psychologist specialized in threat assessments and active threat management. Tammy Hodo, Ph.D., our Closing Keynote, is the Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion at the Florida Coastal School of Law and is responsible for policy development and overall institutional compliance for students, faculty, and staff related to discrimination and harassment. Both Dr. Tau and Dr. Hodo’s contributions to the thought, theory, practice and evolution of behavioral intervention efforts reflect NaBITA’s continued mission to provide education, development and support to higher education, K-12 and workplace professionals who endeavor every day to make their communities safer through caring prevention and early intervention. We are excited and honored to have them with us to bookend NaBITA’s milestone 10th conference, and look forward to the energizing dialogue and substantive learning that comes as a result.

Whether your goal is to prevent violence, support individuals with disabilities, empower the success of those suffering from mental health challenges, conduct comprehensive threat assessments, or assist those in crisis, the 10th Annual NaBITA Conference and Campus Threat Management Institute joins you in common purpose and exploration of best practices.

We hope to see you this November in San Antonio!

Cordially,

Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., Executive Director
Jen Taylor, Senior Program Coordinator, Conference Chair
Carol Nolen, Conference Committee Member

Important Dates and Deadlines

Registration Opens: February 28, 2018
Call for Programs Opens: February 28, 2018
Call for Programs Deadline: July 13, 2018
Award Nomination Deadline: July 13, 2018
Scholarship Application Deadline: August 3, 2018
Early Bird Registration Deadline: August 31, 2018
Hotel Room Block Closes: October 11, 2018
Regular Registration Deadline: October 19, 2018

2018 Conference Schedule

The below schedule is subject to change based on keynote, panel and featured speaker schedules. The 2018 NaBITA Conference website will be updated with any changes to reflect current session and conference schedules.

Monday, November 5, 2018

  • 9:00am to 12:00pm
    • Morning pre-conference sessions. Requires separate registration. Click here for more information.
  • 1:00pm to 4:00pm
    • Afternoon pre-conference sessions. Requires separate registration. Click here for more information.
  • 4:30pm to 5:45pm
    • Welcome Session for New BITs/First Time Attendees
  • 7:00pm to 8:30pm
    • Opening Keynote
  • 8:30pm to 9:30pm
    • Welcome Reception

Tuesday, November 6, 2018

  • 7:30am to 8:30am
    • Continental Breakfast
  • 8:30am to 10:00am
    • Featured Speakers Session A
  • 10:15am to 11:30am
    • Concurrent Session 1
  • 11:30am to 1:00pm
    • Lunch break
  • 1:00pm to 2:15pm
    • Concurrent Session 2
  • 2:30pm to 3:30pm
    • Roundtable Discussions
  • 3:30pm to 4:00pm
    • Snack Break
  • 4:00pm to 5:30pm
    • Featured Speakers Session B
  • 6:00pm
    • Optional Networking Dinner

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

  • 7:30am to 8:30am
    • Coffee service
  • 8:30am to 10:00am
    • Featured Session 3
  • 10:15am to 11:30am
    • Concurrent Session 3
  • 11:45am to 1:30pm
    • Buffet Lunch and Closing Keynote

2018 NaBITA Annual Conference Registration

Early Bird Registration Deadline: August 31, 2018
Regular Registration Deadline: October 19, 2018

To register via cheque, please complete and submit a registration form.
To register via credit card, please visit our online store.

Conference registration provides admittance to the conference November 5th to 7th, 2018, including an opening reception, continental breakfast, beverages and snacks. To see which meals are expected to be included in the conference registration fee, please click here. The meal inclusions are subject to change. The 2018 Conference website will be updated with any changes to reflect current inclusions. Admittance to the pre-conference sessions requires separate registration.

For information on the NaBITA Refund Policy, click here.

Registration Rates:

Conference Early Bird Registration (Register by Friday, August 31, 2018)

  • Non-members — $560 per person
  • Individual/Case Manager NaBITA Members — $498 per person
  • Standard NaBITA Members — 1st Registrant $235; additional registrants — $494 per person
  • Enhanced NaBITA Members — 1st Registrant free; additional registrants — $428 per person

Conference Regular Registration (After Friday, August 31, 2018)

  • Non-members — $660 per person
  • Individual/Case Manager NaBITA Members — $598 per person
  • Standard NaBITA Members — 1st Registrant $335; additional registrants — $594 per person
  • Enhanced NaBITA Members — 1st Registrant free; additional registrants — $528 per person

To register via cheque, please complete and submit a registration form.
To register via credit card, please visit our online store

Need a copy of NaBITA’s W-9? Download it here.
Registration questions? Please contact conference@nabita.org.
For information on the NaBITA Refund Policy, click here.

2018 NaBITA Campus Threat Management Institute Registration

Early Bird Registration Deadline: August 31, 2018
Regular Registration Deadline: October 19, 2018

To register via cheque, please complete and submit a registration form.
To register via credit card, please visit our online store

Institute registration provides admittance to the Conference on November 5-7, 2018, and Institute sessions from November 7-9, 2018. To see which meals are expected to be included in the conference and institute registration fee, please click here. The meal inclusions are subject to change. The 2018 Conference website will be updated with any changes to reflect current inclusions. Admittance to the pre-conference sessions requires separate registration.

For information on the NaBITA Refund Policy, click here.

Institute Registration Rates:

Conference and Campus Threat Management Institute Early Bird Registration
(Register by Friday, August 31, 2018)

  • Non–member Rate = $1,804.00
  • Individual/Case Manager Member Rate = $1,600.00 per person
  • Standard Member rate: 1st person = $1,326.00, additional registrants= $1,600.00 per person
  • Enhanced Member rate: 1st person = $1,002.00, additional registrants= $1,525.00 per person
  • Group rate* (4 or more individuals from same institution): $1,185.00 per person

Conference and Campus Threat Management Institute Regular Registration (After Friday, August 31, 2018)

  • Non–member Rate = $1,904.00
  • Individual/Case Manager Member Rate = $1,700.00 per person
  • Standard Member rate: 1st person = $1,426.00, additional registrants = $1,700.00 per person
  • Enhanced Member rate: 1st person = $1,102.00, additional registrants = $1,625.00 per person
  • Group rate* (4 or more individuals from same institution): $1,270.00 per person

* Group rate is only available for Institute registrations.

Institute registration includes Conference registration. Institute registration does not include pre-con registration.

To register via cheque, please complete and submit a registration form.
To register via credit card, please visit our online store

Need a copy of NaBITA’s W-9? Download it here.
Registration questions? Please contact info@nabita.org.
For information on the NaBITA Refund Policy, click here.

 Opening Keynote Speaker and Session

NaBITA is pleased to welcome Manny Tau, Psy.D.

Dr. Manny Tau is a clinical and forensic psychologist specialized in threat assessments and active threat management, and a Certified Threat Manager™ by the Association of Threat Assessment Professionals. He has been extensively used as a workplace/school-place/personal violence and threat management consultant throughout the United States. He also works with many recognized federal, state, county, city and private organizations in the development of their violence prevention programs and the implementation of Threat Management Teams, along with providing expert consultation and testimony for attorneys in the labor & employment, civil and family law arenas.

Dr. Tau has 20 years of experience performing threat assessment and threat management services in the private and public sectors, which included support of law enforcement agencies and professional security firms. He has provided trainings related to threat assessments and threat management, which included presentations/trainings for the California Bar Association, the Association of Family and Conciliation Courts, the Supreme Court of Nevada, the Orange County Intelligence Assessment Center, the San Diego Sheriff’s Department Threat Assessment Group, the Association of Threat Assessment Professionals, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Dr. Tau currently serves on the Board of Directors for the Association of Threat Assessment Professionals, San Diego Chapter, CA. An experienced and dynamic speaker, Dr. Tau has presented nationwide on topics related to threat assessments and targeted violence for professional organizations in the Human Resources, Risk Management, security, legal and mental health fields, and has appeared in newsprint, radio, television and Internet media. Dr. Tau was also an invited TED Talk speaker for TEDx Mission Viejo in October 2016.

Opening Keynote Session

Targeted Violence: Threatscapes, Threat Assessments & Threat Management

“Nothing is easier than to denounce the evildoer; nothing is more difficult than to understand him.” Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1866.

The past thousands of years have yielded dramatic evolutionary changes in the technology of violence and the technology of information. But what has not changed over time is the dark human nature of targeted violence. This session will address the threatscapes of targeted violence and the convergences of school-place, workplace and domestic violence. Targeted violence is not an event but rather a process, and it is in this process warning behaviors and triggering events may be identified as having threat potentials. Threat posturing, preparatory behaviors and/or rehearsal fantasies of targeted violence are often behavioral indicators of an emerging threat potential. Threat assessments and threat management issues will be addressed in our efforts to mitigate, contain and manage a threat potential. As professional guardians, we do not strive for success, we strive for zero failure.

Closing Keynote Speaker

NaBITA is pleased to welcome Tammy Hodo, Ph.D.

Dr. Hodo was born in Milwaukee, WI.  She earned her Bachelor of Science Degree in Criminal Justice from Albany State University and a Master of Public Administration Degree from Columbus State University in 1998.  Tammy went on to receive her Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in Urban Studies, with a specialization in Race, Class, Gender, and Ethnicity. She has worked in academia for over ten years in a variety of positions, including as a faculty member. She is also a disabled Navy Veteran.

Her most recent Administrative role was as the Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion for a law school where she was responsible for policy development and overall institutional compliance for students, faculty, and staff related to discrimination and harassment, including violations of the non-discrimination policy and the sexual misconduct policy. She was also responsible for overall Title IX compliance, including the coordination, monitoring, and assessment of training and prevention efforts for faculty, staff, students related to sexual misconduct and the coordination of climate studies related to Title IX and diversity. Dr. Hodo investigated and provided resolution of complaints related to discrimination, harassment, and sexual misconduct, including informal resolutions/mediation where appropriate and assigned investigators.

Currently, Dr. Hodo is a Visiting Assistant Professor at the University of North Florida (UNF), where she teaches courses on racial and ethnic minorities, Introduction to Sociology, and Research Methods.  Dr. Hodo’s teaching and research interest focuses on the experiences of minorities, both faculty and students in academia, specifically at Primarily White Institutions (PWI).

Closing Keynote Session

Does Implicit Bias Influence your Behavior Intervention Team?  A Conversation about Microaggressions and the Effects of Implicit Biases on Marginalized Groups in Academia

This session will cover implicit bias and the impact it may have on Behavior Intervention Teams in regard to referrals and sanctions. Implicit bias is unconscious and is a way for us to categorize people, places and things. It happens quickly, similar to our ability to assess a situation and determine if we are in danger. Studies continue to document the disparity in expulsion and suspensions rates in the K-12 system between whites and those viewed as “the other.” It would be reasonable to assume these same tendencies may be at play in the higher education environment. Is this a cultural issue or is it implicit bias on the part of some educators and administrators?
This keynote will also define and discuss how microaggressions affect those in marginalized communities. Microaggression refers to the casual degradation of any marginalized group, such as suggesting that someone is a criminal based solely on their physical appearance. This can impact our assessments on the BIT, the application of the NaBITA Threat Assessment Tool, and what data we look for or avoid searching for in a case. How do we ensure that we are practicing cultural relativism, which is the ability to value or respect another’s culture, although its ideologies’ or practices may not align with our own? This session will be useful for all three phases of the BIT: data gathering, applying a rubric, and providing interventions that take into account marginalized status.

Pre-Conference Sessions

NaBITA will host two morning half-day pre-conference session and two afternoon half-day pre-conference sessions on Monday, November 5. Pre-con sessions are not included as part of your conference or Institute registration and require an additional payment. Conference or Institute registration is required in order to attend a pre-con session.

Pre-con Schedule at a Glance
Monday, November 5, 2018

9:00am – 12:00pm: Pre-conference 1: Beyond Assessment: Management of Social Media/Written/Email Threats, Suicide, Threatening Behavior, and Other Mental Health Crises on Campus

1:00pm-4:00pm: Pre-conference 2: Mandated Counseling: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

9:00am – 12:00pm: Pre-conference 3: Lend a Hand: Mental Health Awareness and Intervention Training

1:00pm-4:00pm: Pre-conference 4: PASS: Preventing Another Student Suicide

Pre-Con Session Information

9:00am – 12:00pm
Pre-conference 1: Beyond Assessment: Management of Social Media/Written/Email Threats, Suicide, Threatening Behavior, and Other Mental Health Crises on Campus

Presented by Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., Executive Director of NaBITA; Senior Vice President for Professional Program Development, The NCHERM Group, LLC 

Over the past few years, NaBITA had received dozens of cases revolving around social media, concerning content in classroom writing assignments, and through emails. This session will briefly review how the Violence Risk Assessment of the Written Word (VRAW2) is used to assess these cases and move into the ongoing management of these students, faculty, and staff who create and present concerning material to the community. Much of NaBITA’s work has centered on research-based, objective labeling and understanding of behavior as a first step to applying the more efficacious and effective intervention for these students. Following the OCR Dear Colleague letter that clarified (and somewhat limited) the removal of students via forced medical withdrawals, colleges and universities are more limited in being able to separate students. This workshop will be case-study driven and center on the interplay among student conduct, HR, disability and accommodation services, mental health, and law enforcement. Cases will include direct threats, intimidating writing, sexual aggressive and intimidating behaviors, mental health crisis, suicide, psychosis and mania with a focus on the practical and on-going management from a law enforcement, student conduct, HR, disability services and mental health lens.

1:00pm – 4:00pm
Pre-Conference 2: Mandated Counseling: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly
Presented by Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., Executive Director of NaBITA; Senior Vice President for Professional Program Development, The NCHERM Group, LLC

Can we force someone into treatment who doesn’t want to go? What do we do with someone whom everyone is concerned about, but we can’t make them leave school? How do we communicate with the counseling center if they can’t talk to us because of confidentiality? Is there a way to do mandated treatment well? What are the pitfalls to avoid? What are the legal, ethical, and ADA/504 implications of mandated treatment? What are some alternatives?

Join Dr. Van Brunt for an exploration of the always controversial topic of providing mandated treatment to college students. He will review both sides of the issue, discuss the ethical challenges, how clinical staff can work with resistant or defensive clients, alternatives to mandated therapy such as educational programming and case management, and some common pitfalls to avoid when rolling out a mandated therapy program on campus. The first half of the program will offer an overview of the debate, best practices when offering this type of care, and alternatives if mandated treatment is not for your campus. The second half of the program will walk participants through several case studies where mandated treatment was used and will highlight communication expectations between departments, information sharing, and how to avoid running afoul of ADA/504.

9:00am – 12:00pm
Pre-conference 3: Lend a Hand: Mental Health Awareness and Intervention Training
Presented by David J. Denino, LPC, NCC, President of NaBITA; Director Emeritus, Counseling Services and Adjunct Professor/Clinical Mental Health at Southern CT State University

The Lend a Hand program offers the opportunity for Campus BITs, student affairs professionals, student conduct officers, faculty, residential life staff, and other members of the campus community to develop awareness and intervention skills in the areas of Depression, Anxiety, Bi-Polar, and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).  Basic information about suicide will be reviewed; the PASS (Prevent Another Student Suicide) pre-con session will explore suicide prevention in more depth.

This program draws from research based approaches to identify and addressing mental health problems on campus, and will focus on the empowerment of individuals to better understand the nature of mental health crisis events and offer intervention and referrals in a caring and supportive manner.

1:00pm – 4:00pm
Pre-conference 4: PASS: Preventing Another Student Suicide
Presented by David J. Denino, LPC, NCC, President of NaBITA; Director Emeritus, Counseling Services and Adjunct Professor/Clinical Mental Health at Southern Connecticut State University

Preventing Another Suicide (PASS) training is a 3-hour program that focuses on recognizing suicide warning signs, safety assessment and safety planning for students. As part of a comprehensive campus program to prevent suicide, PASS training can help those who have suicidal thoughts and other mental health issues. Suicide is the 2nd leading cause of death on campus, and all staff should become knowledgeable about suicide. PASS training provides an overview of suicide prevention as well as a more in depth review of depression and key protective factors and managing a suicidal person.

Why address these issues? Suicide IS preventable, and mental health issues can first appear in the college-age population. Also, the thoughts and behaviors of people that think about suicide have impact on our campus community.

Course Outline

  • Unit One
    • Overview of suicide/college data
    • Basic Terms
    • Understanding of risk factors, warning signs, and protective factors for suicide
  • Unit Two
    • Depression, Anxiety, Substance Abuse, Comorbidity (“along” with issues), Hopelessness
  • Unit Three
    • Methods of asking
    • Responding to
      • “yes” answers
      • “vague” answers
      • self-injurious behaviors
  • Unit Four
    • Intervention Protocol
      • Keeping person safe
      • Risk assessment
      • Low/Medium/High levels of concern
      • Referral to help
      • Specific suicide assessment instruments (non-clinical)
  • Unit Five
    • Self-care, take away card, suicide resources, reference materials
    • Final Q & A

Learning Objectives

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of suicide, including risk factors, warning signs
  2. Understand general symptomatic presentation
  3. Feel comfortable in “asking the question,” start the conversation
  4. Provide intervention
  5. Refer and follow-up

Pre-Con Registration Information

Cost per pre-conference session:

$280 per person for non-members
$249 per person for NaBITA members

Combo rate – register for both the morning session and one afternoon pre-con session and receive 20% off the total price, members and non-members: $448

To register via cheque, please complete and submit a registration form.
To register via credit card, please visit our online store

*You MUST have registered and paid for the pre-con session(s) in order to attend the pre-con session(s). This requires an additional payment from your Conference or Institute registration, regardless of your membership level.*

Registration deadline is October 19, 2018.

For information on the NaBITA Refund Policy, click here.

Welcome Session

Welcome First-Time NaBITA Attendees/New BIT Members

Welcome to the 2018 NaBITA Conference! Let us help you get your bearings at #NaBITA2018. New this year, this session will introduce any new attendees or members of new teams to the history of NaBITA & The NCHERM Group, people to know, BIT basics, tools of the trade, and offer advice on how to get the most out of your first NaBITA Conference!

Featured Speakers

The 2018 NaBITA Annual Conference features presenters chosen for their topical expertise by the conference committee. The conference committee also invites those with promising models, valuable experience and professional expertise to share your knowledge in our concurrent sessions.

  • Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., NaBITA Executive Director; Senior Executive Vice President for Professional Program Development, The NCHERM Group, LLC
  • Saundra K. Schuster, J.D., Partner, The NCHERM Group, LLC and NaBITA Past-President
  • Daniel C. Swinton, J.D., Ed.D., Managing Partner, The NCHERM Group, LLC
  • Rosemarie Conforti, Ph.D., Media Studies Associate Professor and Media Critic, Southern Connecticut State University
  • Amanda Snook, Ph.D., United States Secret Service, National Threat Assessment Center of the U.S. Secret Service
  • Jamie Molnar, LMHC, Assistant Director, Chair, Students of Concern Assistance Team, University of South Florida – Saint Petersburg
  • Makenzie Schiemann, M.S., Associate Consultant, The NCHERM Group, LLC; Associate Executive Director, NaBITA
  • Aaron “Chip” Reese, Ed.D., Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students, Columbus State University, NaBITA Past-President
  • David J. Denino, LPC, NCC, President of NaBITA; Director Emeritus, Counseling Services and Adjunct Professor/Clinical Mental Health at Southern CT State University
  • Joseph Allen, Ed.D., Director, Student Services, National University; Affiliated Consultant, The NCHERM Group, LLC
  • Junaid M. Afeef, J.D., Program Director for the Targeted Violence Prevention Program at the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority
  • Nicole Morgan, M.S. Assistant Director, Student Outreach and Support; Case Manager, University of South Florida

Featured Speaker Sessions

Featured Speaker Session A

Social Media Goes to School: What Could Go Wrong?
Presented by Rosemarie Conforti, Ph.D., Associate Professor at Southern Connecticut State University

Screens are at the center of student life. Texts, snaps, and tweets are the way young people communicate, spend leisure time, and learn. Mobile devices are given undivided attention, even in the classroom. While not all students may be consumed by smartphones, on average, they spend approximately nine hours per day with screens and social media. How did we become a techno-utopian society that barely considers the possible negative influences technology could have on students?

This session examines the influence of social media on students from the media ecological perspective and explains why the question of tech neutrality vs. tech determinism matters to BITs. From this critical perspective, the speaker will demonstrate how social media reshape conventional student attitudes, beliefs, values, and behaviors. Included will be recent statistics and updates on the new media landscape and how media and technology are changing traditional classroom and university environments.

Build your BIT
Presented by Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., Executive Director of NaBITA; Senior Vice President for Professional Program Development, The NCHERM Group, LLC; Jamie Molnar, LMHC, Assistant Director, Chair, Students of Concern Assistance Team, University of South Florida – Saint Petersburg; Makenzie Schiemann, M.S., Associate Consultant, The NCHERM Group, LLC; Associate Executive Director, NaBITAAaron “Chip” Reese, Ed.D., Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students, Columbus State University, NaBITA Past-President; David J. Denino, LPC, NCC, President of NaBITA; Director Emeritus, Counseling Services and Adjunct Professor/Clinical Mental Health at Southern CT State University and Joseph Allen, Ed.D., Director, Student Services, National University; Affiliated Consultant, The NCHERM Group, LLC

Join members of NaBITA’s Advisory Board and BIT chairs from campuses across the country as they share best practices and approaches on how to successfully build a Behavioral Intervention Team from the ground up. Whether you are a new team or looking for some advice to make your process truly shine, this session is for you. The panel will share their hard-won insights from developing teams on community college, online and four-year campuses and discuss issues related to marketing, advertising, building a budget, team communication, FERPA and confidential law, the role of clinical staff on the BIT, record-keeping, and how to develop an effective team policy and procedure manual.

The Role of Ideology in Hate-Inspired Targeted Violence: An Indicator or a Red Herring?
Presented by Junaid M. Afeef, J.D., Program Director for the Targeted Violence Prevention Program at the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority

Hate-inspired targeted violence, often referred to as “violent extremism,” creates challenges among law enforcement, social service and mental health providers, and other individuals poised to help those in crisis.

Two of the major questions in targeted violence prevention work are: (1) are there unique legal, ethical, and safety issues involved with early intervention of people who identify with violent hate groups or foreign terrorist organizations? and (2) what role does ideology play and can behavioral intervention teams help off-ramp individuals who appear to be aligned with a violent ideology?

This presentation provides an overview of the role of violent ideologies in targeted violence in the United States, the distinctions between foreign and domestic terrorism and other mass casualty attacks, and examples of challenges faced by communities in Illinois attempting to address hate-inspired targeted violence. The presentation will also offer participants an opportunity to discuss of the impact of the different labels placed upon individuals who gravitate to these ideologies when it comes to prevention and early intervention efforts and how stakeholders such as mental health and other social service providers, faith-based groups, and civil liberties advocates perceive efforts to use ideology as a risk factor for targeted violence. It concludes with a recommendation that ideology play a small role alongside other risk and protective factors

Featured Speaker Session B

Enhancing Campus Safety with a Threat Assessment Program
Presented by Amanda Snook, Ph.D., Social Science Research Specialist, National Threat Assessment Center, United States Secret Service

This presentation will discuss the findings of the National Threat Assessment Center’s research report examining incidents of targeted violence on college and university campuses. Further, using case studies and interactive examples, the presentation will examine how to prevent targeted violence on campuses using the threat assessment model developed by the U.S. Secret Service.  The model includes: identifying potential threats and individuals who may be exhibiting concerning behaviors on campus; investigating and gathering information on the background and behaviors of concerning individuals; assessing whether individuals pose a threat of violence or other harmful behavior; and developing risk management strategies and interventions.

BIT and Section 504/ADA
Presented by Saundra K. Schuster, J.D., Partner, The NCHERM Group, LLC and NaBITA Past-President

Public and private colleges are subject to oversight by the courts and OCR for disability-related discrimination.  Students with mental health issues often exhibit behavior that creates concerns and are reported to your BIT.  Students with mental health issues are likely to have a qualifying disability either by diagnosis and documentation, or by our regarding the student as such.  In these cases, the student is protected by both 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and ADA.  This session addresses the requirements and contours of disability issues as it impacts your BIT and conduct. This program explores the legal and best practice implications of the Section 504 Direct Threat standard and the way in which it impacts BIT-based decisions.  It will also address the philosophical implications of separating versus retaining students who have actual mental health and or disability conditions.

Using Case Management Data to Inform Practice and Develop Campus Trainings
Presented byMakenzie Schiemann, M.S., Associate Consultant, The NCHERM Group, LLC; Associate Executive Director, NaBITA  and Nicole Morgan, M.S. Assistant Director, Student Outreach and Support; Case Manager, University of South Florida – Tampa

This presentation will analyze Case Management and Behavioral Intervention Team referral processes and campus trainings implemented at USF Tampa. Based on case management referral data, focusing specifically on the academic years 2014-2015 through 2016-2017, which indicated low referral numbers with a large percentage of referrals for high risk issues, USF developed a campus training on early intervention. Post-training referral data indicates a significant increase in overall referrals and a shift toward early intervention.

During this program session, presenters will discuss the analysis of the referral data as well as provide an overview of the referral process at USF. This discussion will include an overview of how USF assesses the level of concern and identifies areas of concern. Presenters will identify the data points that indicated the need for a programmatic change and will review the training plan developed as a result of the data. Furthermore, the presentation will provide the participants with an in-depth look at the training program developed so that they may be able to develop and implement a training program on their campus. Finally, the presentation will review the data which demonstrates the impact the training program had on the case management program referrals and the implications this data has for practice and policy.

Featured Speaker Session C

Clearing Up the Confusion: Mental Health and Mass Shootings
Presented by Lisa Pescara-Kovach, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Educational Psychology, Director, Center for Education in Targeted Violence & Suicide, University of Toledo 

This session will address the misconception that mental illness causes mass shootings. Despite there being little to no evidence, the public and media often share the opinion that severe mental illness is a primary cause of mass shootings. Though it proliferates, this message is not supported in research and could have a detrimental impact on the accuracy of a violence or risk assessment. Descriptions of those struggling with mental health issues as those who are likely to perpetrate mass violence fail to address other factors that play a key role in these events. Attendees will develop an understanding of those mental health issues that are actual risk factors, as well as those falsely implicated. A bio-psycho-social approach will provide the framework to allow a better understanding of the perfect storm that comes together to place an individual on the pathway to violence.

Title IX and BIT
Presented by W. Scott Lewis, J.D., NaBITA Past-President; Partner, The NCHERM Group, LLC, and Daniel Swinton, J.D., Ed.D., Managing Partner of The NCHERM Group, LLC 

There is obvious intersection between sexual assault and BIT, as well as any other type of harassment or bullying. But where is the formal intersection? Should the Title IX Coordinator be on the BIT? What about the Deputy Coordinator? If they are in some other capacity, how should they manage the many roles? This session will address these intersections and other issues surrounding core and inner circle membership on a BIT.

Conduct Meets Counseling: Conundrum, Conflict, or Cooperation?
Presented by David J. Denino, LPC, NCC, President of NaBITA; Director Emeritus, Counseling Services and Adjunct Professor/Clinical Mental Health at Southern CT State University and Chris Piscitelli, Assistant Dean of Students & Director of Student Conduct at Southern CT State University

Generally, students managing mental health issues may be involved in conduct-related processes in two ways: as students of concern allegedly engaging in inappropriate behaviors; and as reporting parties of incidents of harassment and assault. Conduct officers, Title IX investigators, and Behavioral Intervention/Care Teams struggle to provide equitable and fair conduct processes while also dealing with aspects of the student’s struggle with mental health problems.

BIT/Care Teams may struggle with the fact that students with mental health issues are often at a greater risk for experiencing violence and harassment. At the same time, the trauma associated with incidents of violence is also linked with mental health problems. Therefore, the likelihood that investigations of conduct concerns may involve students experiencing mental health difficulties is increased. From minor depression and anxiety, to increasingly severe disorders; our ability to communicate, build rapport, apply policy, and gather information about incidents can be hindered when students are also struggling with mental health.

As more students enroll in college with mental health concerns, behavioral issues arise with these students that may or may not stem from problems with mental health. Colleges may feel compelled to lower academic and behavioral standards because the student is experiencing mental health difficulties. Unfortunately, far too often, the behaviors continue and the institution has now enabled a pattern of misbehavior that becomes increasingly difficult to manage because they fell out of alignment with established policy and standards. In many of these cases, the student is also protected under ADA from discrimination on the basis of disability. Some colleges may err on the other end of the spectrum, and fail to provide the reasonable accommodations related to policies or practice required for the student with a disability.

This presentation explores the complexities of mental health and conduct processes, focusing on both aspects of reporting and responding parties managing mental health problems.

  • When is it appropriate to use conduct processes to address behaviors that may be related to mental health?
  • How can BIT/Care Teams gather information related to incidents of violence and harassment when a student is also experiencing mental health problems?
  • What investigation techniques are best suited to limit the distress of all parties involved in conduct processes?
  • How can conduct officers, counselors, investigators, BITs, and disability offices collaborate to provide services to students with mental health issues while also maintaining the behavioral standards and safety of the institution?
  • Who makes the call for mandated assessment for mental health and/or threat assessment?

This session will explore these issues and provide case studies that will elicit discussion about managing conflict and provide for successful outcomes for the student and institution.

Concurrent Speaker Sessions

Concurrent Session One

Rising Suicide Rates: Legal Liability Management and BIT
Carolyn Reinach Wolf, Esq., J.D., M.S., M.B.A., Executive Partner and Director of the Mental Health Law Department, Abrams, Fensterman, Fensterman, Eisman, Formato, Ferrara & Wolf, LLP

This session will cover the issue of the college/university’s legal liability for a student’s suicide, including an analysis of the “special relationship” requirement through the use of case studies and recent case law. We will examine a recent wrongful death case, where the highest court in the state of Massachusetts held that MIT was not liable for the student’s suicide, but suggested that there are limited circumstances in which universities could bear some responsibility for protecting their students. As suicide rates are rising, it is more important than ever to ensure that the college campus and its members are aware of their role and responsibilities when it comes to student suicide. We will explore the role of Behavioral Intervention Teams and review relevant legislation (Affordable Care Act, ADA, FERPA, HIPAA, etc.) Lastly, we will review risk management practices such as parental notification and suicide prevention protocols.

What Motivates the Female Lone Wolf?
Lisa Pescara-Kovach, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Educational Psychology; Director, Center for Education in Targeted Violence and Suicide, The University of Toledo

Mass shootings perpetrated by females occur less often than those perpetrated by males. However, our nation must be prepared to recognize at-risk behaviors in females despite the perception that they are too rare to raise concern. As with the recent YouTube headquarters shooter, females who carry these acts to fruition possess many of the same traits previously identified in males, yet are also motivated by other factors. It is likely those that reach fruition slip through the cracks due to a general misperception of what drives females to perpetrate mass shootings. This misperception is cause for concern as is evident by the recent San Bernardino and YouTube incidents.

The concurrent session will dispel myths and provide facts related to female mass shooters toward increasing awareness of the characteristics they share with male mass shooters, as well as those that set them apart. It is of great importance that there is greater understanding of these individuals, as incorrect information may result in a failure of witnesses to report at-risk behaviors and BITs to be more dismissive when shooter traits are recognized in females as opposed to males.

The Influence of Sociological Conditions on Violent Self-Expression
Victoria Dagostino-Kalniz, Ph.D., Associate Lecturer, The University of Toledo, The Judith Herb College of Education, Department of Educational Foundations and Leadership
Jessica Swan, Doctoral Candidate, The University of Toledo, The Judith Herb College of Education, Department of Educational Foundations and Leadership

Humans are biopsychosocial beings. All three of these forces interact to affect human development, cognition, and behavior, and we cannot begin to understand the person without a comprehensive understanding of the each of these facets and their interrelationships. While the biological factors and their influence on the expression of violence are well-researched and recognized, the sociological conditions of society and their impact on violent self-expression needs deeper exploration. The sociological influence on individual self-expression is typically unstated, understated, or completely neglected in the attempt to understand its relationship to mental illness and violent self-expression. In this presentation, we will examine violence as a biopsychosocial phenomenon, focusing on how sociological conditions and processes interact with individuals’ psyches to influence self-expression through violence. The works of Erich Fromm, Hannah Arendt, Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, and others will be evoked to illustrate the relationship between sociological conditions and psychic development. The basic premises underlying this presentation include: 1) that social arrangements in a given society contour the psychological processes (and consequently, the actions) of individuals; 2) that North American social conditions cause individuals to feel disempowered and alienated from their true nature; 3) that violence is a socially-sanctioned method for taking back one’s power and agency; and 4) that individuals lack understanding of their own feelings of alienation (and frustration) and the causes of these feelings contributing to the problem of violence (both internalized and externalized).

Supporting your BIT through Community Building Teams and Programs
Megan H Jaros, M.S., LMFT, Manager of Case Management, Rochester Institute of Technology

Community-building teams and their programs can actively support the work of the BIT. Learn how to compose a community building team on your campus and structure yearly programming. Discuss how technology can be used to enhance this team and the BIT simultaneously. This session will provide an overview of Rochester Institute of Technology’s Tigers Care Team and Student Behavioral Consultation Team, discuss how tragedy began Tigers Care (intersection between campus events and RIT’s population), offer an overview of website and initial video campaigns for years two and three,  the composition of the team: then and now, expectations for team members and for budgeting, use of evaluations, use of technology, and use of social media.

Growing Pains: A Real-Life Case Study of a Community College BIT in Progress
Nikki Nieset, Ph.D.., Counseling Faculty, Chandler-Gilbert Community College
Kishia Brock, Ph.D., Vice President of Student Affairs, Chandler-Gilbert Community College 
Bernadette LaMazza, M.M., Assoc. VP Finance & Business Services, Chandler-Gilbert Community College
Yvette Strickland, M.Ed., Student Affairs Case Manager, Chandler-Gilbert Community College

Join multidisciplinary members of a community college BIT as we share an honest insiders’ view into the good, the bad, and the ugly we have encountered trying to establish and grow from reactionary threat assessment to proactive prevention for our campus community. This is not the textbook model case study; this was the well-intentioned but unorganized group for whom NaBITA writes its annual whitepapers. In the past year, the team has made significant progress that can be measured both qualitatively through member experiences as well as best practice recommendations like CORE Q-10.

Session Snapshots
Moderated by Makenzie Schiemann, M.S., Associate Consultant, The NCHERM Group, LLC; Associate Executive Director, NaBITA
Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., Executive Director of NaBITA; Senior Vice President for Professional Program Development, The NCHERM Group, LLC

 This session will allow presenters the opportunity to give a brief 10-minute overview of their ideas and research to session attendees. This session will be shared between several presentations, rotating through each group as they provide a snapshot within a 10-minute allotted timeframe. Session topics include:

  • Get Better Reports: Lessons Learned in Cleaning Up the Reporting Process
    Timothy Touchette, Ed.D., Assistant Dean of Student Affairs, Brandeis University
    Are your care/student of concern reports not where you want them to be? This presentation will review a comprehensive overhaul of our reporting structure and how the ability to report was made easier and clearer. We will review best practices as well as how we leverage our technology in a way that makes everything easier for the Care Team and its constituents.
  • Growing Pains: A Real-Life Case Study of a Community College BIT in Progress
    Nikki Nieset, Ph.D., Counseling Faculty, Chandler-Gilbert Community College; Kishia Brock, Ph.D, Vice President of Student Affairs, Chandler-Gilbert Community College; Bernadette LaMazza, M.M., Assoc. VP Finance & Business Services, Chandler-Gilbert Community College; and Yvette Strickland, M.Ed., Student Affairs Case Manager, Chandler-Gilbert Community College
    Join multidisciplinary members of a community college BIT as we share a honest insiders’ view into the good, the bad, and the ugly we have encountered trying to establish and grow from reactionary threat assessment to proactive prevention for our campus community. This is not the textbook model case study; this was the well-intentioned but unorganized group for whom NaBITA writes its annual whitepapers.  In the past year, the team has made significant progress that can be measured both qualitatively through member experiences as well as best practices recommendations like CORE Q-10.
  • Student Athletes: Challenges for BIT Teams
    Eileen Daniel, Ed.D., Vice Provost, SUNY Brockport and Karen Logsdon, Assistant to the Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Affairs, SUNY Brockport
    Mental health is a vital and sometimes overlooked aspect of a student-athlete’s overall health and optimal functioning. The college athletic environment has both risk and protective factors for student athletes experiencing mental health disorders. Athletes have a unique set of challenges and demands that may cause an increase in psychological distresses including but not limited to long hours practicing and training, trips to athletic events, performance expectations, and pressure to excel (Rao & Jong, 2016). College athletes have the added stress of being a student who must balance academic, athletic, and social demands (Wolanin et al., 2016). An estimated 10% to 15% of college student-athletes suffer from clinically relevant psychological distress (Barnard, 2016) and an average of 8% to 9% of student-athletes seek help from campus mental health services. In addition to mental health issues, athletes present with a variety of other concerns including eating disorders and alcohol and substance abuse (Lewis et al. 2017; Quatromoni et al.; 2017; Orsini et al., 2018).  This interactive session will address the various mental health issues experienced by student athletes and the Behavioral Intervention Team’s responses.
  • Success Planning with Students: Utilizing the I-CARE Student Success Plan Following Hurricane Harvey
    Angela Walker, M.S., Associate Dean of Students, Texas A&M University Corpus Christi
    Stephanie Majors, M.S., LPC Intern, I-CARE Case Manager, Texas A&M University Corpus Christi
    When a student is experiencing distress, how can you as a student affairs professional help them to get back on the road to success? This session will highlight the I-CARE Student Success Plan utilized when working with students in distress and how it has evolved to support TAMUCC students referred to the I- CARE program. The I-CARE Student Success Plan was designed to assist our Islanders to move from a state of struggling or distress to a sense of safety, well-being and success. We will illustrate how throughout this five-step process the I-CARE Case Manager partners with the student to navigate campus and community resources by fostering self-advocacy and self-care skills, while addressing their unmet needs, and collaboratively develop a roadmap to help them find success both inside and outside of the classroom. We will demonstrate the success plan through a case study role-play involving a student in distress with complex needs following Hurricane Harvey. The goal is that by the end of this session, you will have a guide to help in implementing the success planning tool with your students on your campus.
  • The Superhero Project: The Rise of the Active Bystander
    Douglas Stoves, Ed.D., Associate Dean for Student Rights and Responsibilities, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley; Mari Morin, M Ed, Program Manager for Student Rights and Responsibilities, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley; and Jaime Richeson, Program Manager for Student Rights and Responsibilities, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
    An effective BIT and CARE team is reliant on receiving reports and information from the communities that they serve. The Superhero Project is an active bystander program that was designed to engage students, faculty and staff and to empower them to report behaviors that they observe. Our project, which is a peer educator model, provided training on our campus and within our local communities to recognize problems, choose an intervention, and most importantly, to act. Led by two staff members and 6 peer educators, our project last year marked over 43,000 impressions. This session will discuss how we developed our program, our implementation strategies, and how campuses can increase reporting.

Concurrent Session Two

Who Sees What We Write?  Legal Considerations for Team Documentation and Communication
Rosie McSweeney, M.S., Behavior Intervention Specialist, University of Texas at San Antonio

Behavioral Intervention Teams must work efficiently to gather information and communicate, often with the assumption that thorough documentation offers proof of effective response.  Universities typically request that concerns be submitted in writing. Documentation can produce quandaries for team members as well as university legal counsel. This session asks the question:  How do laws such as Open Records Act influence gathering of information and communication flow? How do teams and attorneys intersect with state and federal law in terms of documentation? What are best practices regarding the maintaining and releasing of documentation?

Campus Collaboration To Train First Responders Using Virtual Reality Technology
Patricia McSteen, Ph.D., Associate Dean of Students, Ohio University
John Bowditch, MFA, Director, Game Research and Immersive Design Lab; Instructor, Game Design and Development, Ohio University
Josh Crook, MFA Candidate, 360 Video Producer, Ohio University
Eric Williams, M.A., Associate Professor; Director, Communication Media Arts, Ohio University

Collaboration among experts across campus contributes to innovative ways in which the community can address concerning behavior of students.  At Ohio University, faculty and students from the Media Arts & Studies program, law enforcement professionals from the Ohio University Police Department, and staff from the Office of Dean of Students collaborated to produce this creative virtual reality training.

Because of the increase in EDP (emotionally disturbed person) calls to law enforcement, we identified a need to train those who are first responders (residence hall staff, patrol officers, etc.). The traditional scenario-based, role playing trainings, while well-intended, are often awkward and unrealistic. The goal of using virtual reality technology is to create a lasting impression in a safe, controlled environment, so that those first responders have an increase in reps of exposure. Advances in technology enable the trainers to customize the experience while maintaining a platform that can be replicated. Repetition is a known effective training approach.

Another benefit of this training approach is the opportunity for supervisors to provide coaching with a database for after-action review. Additional training can be tailored to areas of need, ultimately growing their skill set. The first response to a person in crisis may influence the student’s openness to help-seeking behavior and utilizing the resources available to help them be successful on campus. Using this technology will allow staff to gain experience with best practices in addressing students of concern.

Supporting Students in Navigating Crisis: A Team Approach
Chaney Cook, Psy.D., Associate Director/Clinical Director Counseling Services, University of Denver
Michael LaFarr, Psy.D., Executive Director of Health and Counseling Center, University of Denver
Joshua Kaufman, Director of Disability Services Program, Universtiy of Denver
Niki Latino, Ph.D., Associate Vice Chancellor for Campus Life and Inclusive Excellence, University of Denver
Molly Hooker, Strategic Planning Analyst-Campus Life and Inclusive Excellence, University of Denver
Kelly Schlabach, Student Outreach & Support Case Manager, University of Denver

At the University of Denver, we take a holistic approach to behavioral intervention. During this interactive session, we will take participants through our Life of a Crisis Assessment Risk Evaluation (C.A.R.E) Behavioral Intervention Team Case, Comprehensive Case Management Framework, Maxient, Behavioral Expectations Letters/FERPA/Comprehensive Individualized Assessments, Decision Trees, and our proactive Traveling Road Show for our faculty and other campus colleagues. It’s a team approach to proactive and reactive behavioral intervention.

When Two Worlds Collide: Assessing Threats in the BIT and Title IX Worlds
D. Matthew Gregory, PhD, Dean of Students, Texas Tech University
Denise K. Tijerina, MPA, Assistant Dean of Students, Texas Tech University

The BIT at Texas Tech University has been in place for over 15 years. Since the implementation of the team, BITs have evolved to include staff on both the BIT and the Title IX case management team who are equipped to determine whether reported behavior constitutes a threat or not. This session will explore the composition of both the BIT and the Title IX case management team. Specifically, the session will focus on the staff who sit on both teams and who are tasked with determining the need for interim actions and for providing remedies to reduce the existence of a potential threat to others. The session will explore existing threat assessment practices that help to avoid the over-application of these measures following a Title IX complaint. Different threat assessment processes, like a formal mental health threat assessment and an immediate threat assessment, will be explored as mechanism to utilize when responding to reported threats. We will identify the process to refer, the gatekeeping that occurs surrounding potentially threatening behavior or reported threats, analyze risk levels, and remedies to assist students through this process.

LGBTQ Panel: 5 Insights for working with LGBTQ students
David J. Denino, LPC, NCC, Director Emeritus, Counseling Services, Adjunct Professor, Clinical Mental Health Program, Southern Connecticut State University; President, NaBITA              
Kevin McCarthy, M.S. , Assistant Vice President/Dean of Students, North Central College
Christine Schramm, M.S., Assistant Vice President of Student Development/Dean of Students, University of Dayton
Carolyn Reinach-Wolf, J.D., Executive Partner and Director of the Mental Health Law Practice, Abrams, Fensterman, Fensterman, Eisman, Formato, Ferrara, Wolf & Carone, LLP, NaBITA Past-President
Laura Ulmer, Ph.D., Director, Student Conduct & Academic Integrity, Old Dominion University
Jamie Molnar, M.App. Psych, LMHC, Students of Concern Assistance Team (SOCAT) Case Manager, University of South Florida St. Petersburg

This panel discussion will provide expertise from six perspectives when working with LGBTQ students that come to the BIT/CARE team. This session will explore: working inside religious institutions and challenging basic premises; LGBTQ students and the law; a case management lens; conduct and Title IX. Discussion will be followed by a case presentation.

Seminal to this presentation will be identity development, mental health concerns (isolation, low self-esteem, depression, anxiety, suicide), relationship differences (friends, familial, interpersonal), and harassment and discrimination (intimidation/bullying, harassment, violence).

The Electronic Database & Your BIT: Tips and Strategies to Make the System Work for You
Chip Reese, Ed.D., Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students, Columbus State University

This training will provide participants with clear guidance and examples for getting the most out of their electronic database. From the moment that an Incident Report is submitted, through closing out the case, participants will gain an understanding of how to eliminate the silos and delays which exist within their BITs. This can save precious time towards a needed intervention, and greatly reduce the threat of harm to self or others. Additionally, participants will also be presented with guidance for producing and presenting an annual BIT evaluation for their campus by utilizing their electronic database. Attendees will learn to address budgeting and effectiveness concerns, as it is becoming increasingly important that BITs demonstrate they can both quantify and qualify their policies, procedures, and outcomes with professional tools and national benchmarking. Participants will gain an understanding of how to utilize their electronic database to produce an annual report which will effectively integrate with their institution’s strategic plan, their BIT’s announced mission and goals, and to satisfy the compliance requirements of regional accrediting associations.

Concurrent Session Three

Preventing School Shootings Requires More Than Gun Control
Carolyn Reinach Wolf, Esq., J.D., M.S., M.B.A., Executive Partner and Director of the Mental Health Law Department, Abrams, Fensterman, Fensterman, Eisman, Formato, Ferrara & Wolf, LLP
Jamie A. Rosen, Esq., Associate Attorney, Mental Health Law Department, Abrams, Fensterman, Fensterman, Eisman, Formato, Ferrara & Wolf, LLP

In the wake of increasing school shootings, several groups, from Parkland, Florida students to lawmakers across the country, have been searching for ways to make our schools, college campuses, and communities safer to prevent future violence. This session will cover the use of BITs for early identification and intervention of students or members of the larger college community that may be at risk for violence, as well as legal issues related to sharing information. We will examine recent school shootings, including profiles of several shooters, and review steps that every college campus can take towards preventing the next tragedy before an individual even thinks of getting a gun.

Getting Ahead of the Curve – Creating a Partnership Between BIT/TAT/RATs and Admission Staff
Kevin McCarthy, M.S. , Assistant Vice President/Dean of Students, North Central College

BIT/TAT/RATs overwhelmingly spend their time reacting to referrals and reports of concerning actions or statements made by college/university constituents. The time devoted to proactively addressing issues may be minimal or nonexistent. North Central College’s BIT has considered the question, “What could we be doing to get ahead of the curve?” Our response was a robust and productive partnership with our institution’s Office of Admission. Specifically, our Admission staff members now regularly submit referrals for incoming students who may need immediate support and resources. In addition, where an applicant identifies a past criminal or disciplinary history that may pose a risk to the campus community, the BIT reviews these cases. During this session, the presenter will cover the importance of open and regular communication with Admission staff and will describe techniques to successfully develop and implement this important partnership with your Admission team.

The BIT at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs): Similarities, Differences, and Challenges
Angela Coleman, Ed.D., Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, North Carolina Central University
Anika Fields, Ph.D., Director, Office of Counseling Services, Florida A&M University
Tanya Tatum, MHA, Director, Student Health Services, Florida A&M University
Antoneia Roe, Esq., Assistant Vice President, Student Affairs, Florida A&M University

This presentation will highlight the history of HBCUs, their historic missions and their success in graduating black students with bachelor, graduate, and professional degrees; areas of similarities and differences between a BIT at Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs) and an HBCU, along with a discussion of challenges, and offer recommendations for BITs at PWIs related to policy needs, procedural issues, training needs, human resources, and communication and cultural barriers.

A Regional BIT Model for Multi-Site Institutions
Sylvia Galvan Gonzalez, M.S., LPC-S, Executive Dean of Counseling, Austin Community College 
Julie Cuellar Reck, M.A., LPC-S, Associate Dean of Counseling, Assistant Professor, Austin Community College 
Rosa M. Rodriguez-Alvarez, M.A., LPC-S, Associate Dean of Counseling, Austin Community College 
Manuel Zamarripa, Ph.D., LP, LPC-S, Associate Dean of Counseling, Austin Community College 
Mary Forrest-Wright, M.A., LPC-S, LMFT-S, Counselor, Professor, Austin Community College 
Patricia Sanchez, M.A., LPC, LCDC, Counselor, Assistant Professor, Austin Community College 
Janie Wang, M.A., LPC-S, Counselor, Assistant Professor, Austin Community College 

For institutions and organizations with multiple sites of services, developing a comprehensive BIT program involves unique challenges to appropriately addressing scope, jurisdiction, and effective assessment of BIT cases. This presentation will introduce a regional model for managing BIT referrals developed at a multi-campus community college and discuss the strategic needs and particular barriers unique to providing BIT coverage across a large network of sites. The presenters will also share a case study involving multi-site BIT management with participants to illustrate features of the model before ending the program with a panel Q/A session involving interdisciplinary members of a regional BIT model.

Postvention After Mass Violence: Toward a Trauma-Informed Community Response
Anneka Busse, Psy.D., M.M.F.T, Crisis Therapist/Care Manager, The Claremont Colleges
Fiona Vajk, Ph.D., Assistant Director/Training Director, The Claremont Colleges

 Postvention guidelines currently do not typically include preparation for an event of mass violence on or near a university or college campus. After such an event, all members of the campus community will be affected. A concrete postvention plan will assist administrators in making key decisions in a short timeframe, to better serve their campus. In this presentation, typical post-traumatic effects after mass violence will be reviewed, as well as factors promoting resilience and healing for both individuals and the community. First-hand experiences from a survivor of mass violence will be presented and discussed to assist participants in understanding the effects on survivors and their loved ones. This session will present recommendations regarding elements to include in a postvention plan, and further questions for individual campuses to consider.

Gallows Humor and BIT Teams: Coping With the Absurd
Jay Coughlin, Psy.D., Director, Counseling and Career Services, Howard Community College

Gallows humor is a specific brand of humor that is sometimes used as a way of coping with traumatic events and life-threatening situations. It is used in arenas that experience high levels of stress, including BITs.  This presentation will explore the use of humor as a coping device and how gallows humor is unique. How does gallows humor help us deal with ironic and absurd situations? When is gallows humor a sign of good coping and when is it a warning sign?  These questions will be answered along with some guidelines for gallows humor use and case examples to illustrate its use.

Roundtable Discussions

Roundtables are an opportunity for focused, informal conversation with colleagues who are working through many of the same issues on their own campuses. This year, two slots have been reserved for our award recipients so that they can speak with our attendees about their programs, and what is working on their campuses.

  1. Community Colleges and BITs
  2. FERPA, Clery & HIPAA
  3. First time attendees: an open dialogue with senior board members
  4. Returning Students/Students Returning from Leave
  5. Burnout/Compassion Fatigue
  6. Long Term Case Management/Managing Chronic Behavior
  7. Award Recipient Discussion
  8. Award Recipient Discussion

2018 Campus Threat Management Institute

Each year, NaBITA strives to expand programmatic events for our members. In 2010, we created the first NaBITA Campus Threat Management Institute, allowing participants to attain a Campus Threat Manager Certificate of Completion after four days of engaging, interactive training. In 2011, Institute attendance increased and even more attendees benefitted from more intense interaction with our faculty. We saw continued growth each year through 2017.

The NaBITA Institute offers an intense level of depth and training for those charged with campus behavioral intervention and threat assessment responsibilities. One of the benefits of the Campus Threat Management Institute is a small faculty:student ratio, with a limit of 125 attendees. Institute registration is open to both NaBITA members and non-members.

Dates:  November 5 – November 9, 2018 (Monday evening to Friday afternoon). The NaBITA Institute runs concurrently with the NaBITA Annual Conference, and then continues for two additional days. Institute registrants will attend the NaBITA Conference (included in the Institute registration fee), in an optional special track for Institute registrants. As attendance at the conference sessions are required to obtain Campus Threat Management Institute certification, participants are not able to register for only the Wednesday-Friday Institute sessions.

The NaBITA conference begins with the Opening Keynote on Monday, November 5, at 7:00pm. The conference runs until 1:15pm on Wednesday, November 7. The Institute continues for the remainder of Wednesday, November 7, all day on Thursday, November 8, and then concludes at 12:00pm on Friday, November 9, 2018.

Location:  The Westin Riverwalk, San Antonio

Intended Participants

  • Campus behavioral intervention team or campus threat assessment team members, especially team Chairs
  • Campus law enforcement/threat assessment professionals
  • Campus mental health professionals
  • Campus violence risk assessors
  • Case managers

Format

Institute registrants will receive intensive training on behavioral assessment, threat management and violence prevention over four days. The Institute is capped at 125 registrants. With an estimated 9 faculty members, the Institute has a 1:14 faculty/participant ratio, and participants will have individual and small-group opportunities to interact with each of the expert faculty members. Institute registrants will participate in the NaBITA Conference from Monday night to Wednesday afternoon with the option to follow a specially designated track with sessions designed to create a comprehensive four-day training curriculum when combined with the longer, more intensive sessions of the Institute on Wednesday afternoon, Thursday, and Friday morning. Some Featured Speakers for the conference will also serve as Faculty for the Institute.

Institute participants will be assigned to a faculty mentor for the case study roundtable session at the Institute. Attendees who participate in the 2018 Conference and Campus Threat Management Institute will receive a certification of completion from NaBITA. For more information on our Continuing Certification Credit (CCC) program, please click here.

NaBITA Campus Threat Management Institute Schedule

Wednesday, November 7
1:30pm to 4:30pm – Choice of 2 Institute sessions

Thursday, November 8
9:00am to 12:00pm – Choice of 2 Institute sessions
1:00pm-1:45pm – Case study discussions led by Institute faculty
2:00pm-5:00pm – Choice of 2 Institute sessions

Friday, November 9
9:00am to 12:00pm – Choice of 2 Institute sessions

Campus Threat Management Institute Sessions

Institute Session A

Structured Interview Violence Risk Assessment (Part I) *
Presented by Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., Executive Director, NaBITA; Senior Vice President for Professional Program Development, The NCHERM Group, LLC, and David J. Denino, LPC, NCC, President of NaBITA; Director Emeritus, Counseling Services and Adjunct Professor/Clinical Mental Health at Southern CT State University

This training will provide participants with a detailed exploration of risk assessment by behavioral intervention and threat assessment teams. The Structured Interview for Violence Risk Assessment (SIVRA-35) is a thirty-five-item inventory designed by Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., that is used to assist Behavioral Intervention Team members and clinical staff in conducting a more thorough and research-based violence risk assessment. The SIVRA-35 is designed to assist with individuals identified as elevated, severe, or extreme risk by the NaBITA Threat Assessment Tool or using similar methodologies. Participants will review the concepts of structured professional judgment, violence risk factors and review the items used in the SIVRA-35 to assess risk.

*Participants who attend both Part I and Part II of this session will receive a complimentary 1-year subscription to access SIVRA.

Establishing Prevention-Based Active Shooter Programs for Colleges/Universities & K-12
Presented by Jeff Solomon, Director of Schools Division, DPREP, Inc.

This training session will focus on the importance of establishing “prevention-based” active shooter programs, concentrating on preventing the act of violence before it occurs. This presentation will review past acts of violence in both the higher education and the K-12 environments, current strategies and policies to build a comprehensive active shooter program, and will provide techniques that will aid in reducing the risk and the anxiety/fear of students and staff.  Participants will learn the importance of integrating behavioral intervention teams and about the risk and threat assessment processes in addition to learning approaches on effective best practices to consider during an active shooter incident. Participants will be provided with common emergency terminology used in both the higher education environment and K-12 schools to ensure that “we are all on the same page” during a critical incident both internally with staff/students and externally with first responders; approaches on student management during an event; and how to communicate during a critical incident such as an active shooter event. We will also discuss common legal “roadblocks” such as the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) as to reporting students of concern and the sharing information. In addition, we will also discuss the recent K-12 resources and additions to NABITA and how the use of prevention-based active shooter programs in the K-12 environment can help colleges and universities in their work as well. This program addresses both preventing the act before it occurs and strategies to mitigate loss of life and injury during an active shooter event.

Institute Session B

Structured Interview Violence Risk Assessment (Part II) *
Presented by Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., Executive Director, NaBITA; Senior Vice President for Professional Program Development, The NCHERM Group, LLC, and David J. Denino, LPC, NCC, President of NaBITA; Director Emeritus, Counseling Services and Adjunct Professor/Clinical Mental Health at Southern CT State University

This training will provide participants with a detailed exploration of risk assessment by behavioral intervention and threat assessment teams. The Structured Interview for Violence Risk Assessment (SIVRA-35) is a thirty-five-item inventory designed by Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., that is used to assist Behavioral Intervention Team members and clinical staff in conducting a more thorough and research-based violence risk assessment. The SIVRA-35 is designed to assist with individuals identified as elevated, severe, or extreme risk by the NaBITA Threat Assessment Tool or using similar methodologies. Participants will review the concepts of structured professional judgment, violence risk factors and review the items used in the SIVRA-35 to assess risk.

*Participants who attend both Part I and Part II of this session will receive a complimentary 1-year subscription to access SIVRA.

Legal Update and Review of Recent Acts of Violence
Presented by W. Scott Lewis, J.D., NaBITA Past-President; Partner, The NCHERM Group, LLC, Saundra K. Schuster, J.D., Partner, The NCHERM Group, LLC and NaBITA Past-President, and Daniel C. Swinton, J.D., Ed.D., Managing Partner, The NCHERM Group, LLC

This session will review key legal cases that occurred during 2017-2018. These cases have implications for Behavioral Intervention Teams, Campus Law Enforcement, Disability Services, Counseling & Health Services and Student Conduct. A review of recent acts of violence will include high profile attacks to provide BIT professionals essential insight and “lessons learned” to move forward with their own prevention and intervention efforts.

Institute Session C

NaBITA Threat Assessment Tool (Part I)
Presented by Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., Executive Director of NaBITA; Senior Vice President for Professional Program Development, The NCHERM Group, LLC; and W. Scott Lewis, J.D., NaBITA Past-President; Partner, The NCHERM Group, LLC

This is a comprehensive training on the NaBITA Threat Assessment Tool, which was updated in the spring of 2014. Participants will learn how to use the tool, with four measures of mental health related risk, five generalized risk measures and nine measures for aggression. With this tool, teams can accurately assess the potential for harm to self, harm to others, and harm to facilities/operations/reputation. Once the tool is explained, participants will work through a set of case studies to assess the risks of each, and then to strategically deploy intervention tools to address those risks.

The De-Escalation Decision Tree (D2T)
Presented by Aaron “Chip” Reese, Ed.D., Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students, Columbus State University, NaBITA Past-President

This session will offer members of Behavioral Intervention Teams a directed methodology for gathering data, applying a rubric/analyzing the data, and then intervening with an appropriate action. After years of chairing a BIT and working with other institutions to develop their policies and processes, Dr. Reese designed the D2T in an effort to assist BITs in making effective, data driven decisions in an organized and articulable manner. When administered properly, the D2T pulls all the pieces of a case together. This session will guide the participants in how to best utilize the NaBITA Threat Assessment Tool, SIVRA-35, and the VRAW2, while also assimilating the myriad of resources and information offered by the institutional experts gathered around the BIT table.

Institute Session D

NaBITA Threat Assessment Tool and Case Review (Part II)
Presented by W. Scott Lewis, J.D., NaBITA Past-President; Partner, The NCHERM Group, LLC

This is a comprehensive training on the NaBITA Threat Assessment Tool, which was updated in the spring of 2014. Participants will learn how to use the tool, with four measures of mental health related risk, five generalized risk measures and nine measures for aggression. With this tool, teams can accurately assess the potential for harm to self, harm to others, and harm to facilities/operations/reputation. Once the tool is explained, participants will work through a set of case studies to assess the risks of each, and then to strategically deploy intervention tools to address those risks.

Case Management in Higher Education: An Overview of the Field and Exploration of How to Apply Specific Case Management Practices
Presented by Jamie Molnar, LMHC, Assistant Director, Chair, Students of Concern Assistance Team, University of South Florida – Saint Petersburg andMakenzie Schiemann, M.S., Associate Consultant, The NCHERM Group, LLC; Associate Executive Director, NaBITA

Colleges and universities are increasingly being tasked with responding to and supporting high risk students that face mental health challenges, homelessness, food insecurities, and academic and personal issues. To support these students, institutions have begun utilizing a case management model to offer wrap around care and resources. This training provides an extensive overview of the evolution of case management in the higher education setting including the foundations of the field, existing models and frameworks, and examples of how to implement case management practices. Presenters will explore examples of specific institutional policies as well as provide two interactive roundtables to give participants an opportunity to apply the material to their own campus and to a sample case study.

Scholarship Opportunity

In service to the field, NaBITA welcomes the submission of scholarship applications for the upcoming Annual NaBITA Conference.  These scholarships aim to assist our colleagues in their professional development and commitment to their chosen profession.

Please click here to complete a scholarship application.

Scholarships will be awarded to applicants based upon written responses to our questions. Please complete the application in full, providing detailed and complete answers for each question.

Scholarships were awarded on August 8, 2018. Please check your spam/junk folder if you are awaiting a response, or contact conference@nabita.org for any questions.

Please note that the scholarship covers registration to the conference only. Successful recipients will be responsible for their own travel, lodging and meal costs, as well as any pre‐conference and Campus Threat Management Institute registration fees should they choose to attend those opportunities.

Awards

The NaBITA Conference Committee is excited to announce that it has developed two awards for best practice and research in the field of behavior intervention. The first is the Best Practices/Institutional Impact Award – to recognize a practice or program that can be modeled by other institutions as a best practice and has been shown to have significant evidence-based impact on the originating institution. The second award is Innovation in Research and Publication – to recognize research that is innovative in its topic, methodology, or program(s) studied. The research can be specific to the functioning of a BIT or programs that serve to educate, provide interventions for or reduce risk among target populations. Selected winners will be honored at the national conference, presented their award, and included or highlighted in The Journal of Campus Behavioral Intervention (J-BIT). The award nomination deadline was July 13, 2018. Submissions will be reviewed by the Awards committee, and applicants will be notified of acceptance/rejection by July 27, 2018.

Best Practices/Institutional Impact Award

This award is intended to recognize a practice or program that can be modeled by other institutions as a best practice and has been shown to have significant evidence-based impact on the originating institution. These practices or programs can be those that are specific to the functioning of a BIT or which serve to educate, provide interventions for, or reduce risk among target populations.

Innovation in Research and Publication Award

This award is intended to recognize research that is innovative in its topic, methodology, or program(s) studied. The research can be specific to the functioning of a BIT or programs that serve to educate, provide interventions for or reduce risk among target populations.

Optional Networking Dinner

NaBITA is proud to facilitate an opportunity for conference attendees to network and engage in open dialogue about pressing issues facing behavioral intervention teams. More information and a sign-up sheet will be available on-site.

WHAT: Group networking dinner on your own

WHEN: Tuesday, November 6 at 6pm

WHERE: A reservation has been made at a local restaurant

*Please note that transportation and payment for meals is the responsibility of  dinner participants. 

The Doctor Is In

Do you have an inquiry specific to the operations of your campus team? Are you looking for some individual time with a national expert in behavioral intervention and threat assessment? Do you have “just a quick question” on how to proceed with a current BIT case? Back by popular demand, NaBITA presents The Doctor Is In, a unique opportunity for conference attendees to sign-up for private Q&A time with NaBITA’s leadership to help answer some of your most pressing questions. Sign up on-site at the conference registration table for a 20 minute-session with a BIT expert! Please note that meeting slots are on a first-come, first-served basis and require you to sign up in advance. Please direct any inquiries regarding The Doctor Is In to Megan BirsterDirector of Marketing Outreach & Business Development, at (610) 993-0229 ext. 1015.

Call for Programs

The Call for Programs deadline has been closed, as of Friday, July 13th, 2018 at 5:00pm ET. Notifications of acceptance/rejection went out electronically on Wednesday, August 1, 2018. Confirmations for accepted and alternate sessions are due by Wednesday, August 15th, 2018. Once the concurrent speaker sessions are confirmed, concurrent sessions will be posted to the website after August 15, 2018.  

Concurrent sessions are 75 minutes long. Selections will be based on the following criteria:

  • Relevance to the topics of behavioral intervention, mental health, violence prevention, threat assessment, model programs, and case management
  • Completeness, detail and professionalism of the proposal
  • Evidence‐based, promising and innovative model programs/practices are welcome
  • Engaging format, presenters and/or concepts

If your program is selected, the presentation abstract provided will be included on the conference site and the printed conference program. Please make sure the abstract clearly conveys the objective, theme and style of the presentation. If accepted, presentation materials will be due on or before September 14, 2018.

Do you have questions? Please read the 2018 NaBITA Annual Conference Concurrent Session FAQs.

Conference Sponsors & Exhibitors

Please click here to view the 2018 Conference Sponsorship & Exhibiting Opportunities brochure and application! This document outlines everything you need to know, including: background information on NaBITA, information about the event and attendee overview, as well as a full breakdown of all of the opportunities at this year’s event.

If you are interested in Conference Sponsorship and/or Exhibiting, please contact conference@nabita.org.

2018 NaBITA Annual Conference Sponsors and Exhibitors

Crisis Prevention Institute

CPI’s adaptable training programs give employees the skills to manage aggressive and potentially dangerous workplace behaviors, including those that occur on campus. Our programs’ proven strategies can reduce the frequency and severity of disruptive incidents, increase campus safety, and improve employee confidence to safely intervene.

 

Promotions. Solutions. Awareness

We are a woman- and veteran-owned small business with the heart for serving others. PSA not only has a robust selection of promotional products, but we have proven expertise in developing educational products for awareness and prevention programs and campaigns. We’ve been partnering with prevention, outreach, and military programs for over 19 years by producing products to help meet your program objectives. This is our PSA Pledge: you receive what you ordered, how you ordered it, when you want it, or we will re-do the order or refund your money. We are proud of our low error rate, but want you to be assured that if there is a problem, (we are only human after all!) we will do what it takes to provide you, “Service Like No Other!”

 

JED is a nonprofit that exists to protect emotional health and prevent suicide for our nation’s teens and young adults. We’re partnering with high schools and colleges to strengthen their mental health, substance abuse and suicide prevention programs and systems. We’re equipping teens and young adults with the skills and knowledge to help themselves and each other. We’re encouraging community awareness, understanding and action for young adult mental health.

 

 

Awareity

We believe the world can be a safer place if we give Good People the advantage over evil doers. This advantage requires questioning status quo thinking and looking at things differently on purpose. We value knowledge-driven actions which is why we do extensive research and listening, then we design and deliver the best strategies, tools, and support possible to make sure our clients and their communities are doing the right things to not just feel safer, but be safer. We’ve seen world-changing results start with a single piece of the puzzle (Awareity Butterfly Effect), are you ready to do your part in changing the world forever?

ConcernCenter

ConcernCenter is a new tool that puts support in your student’s hands, literally! This mobile website, customizable to your institution and developed by a BIT leader, allows students to access resources on your campus based upon specific concerns.  Examples include, “I’m having trouble paying for textbooks,” “I’m failing classes,” “I’m not making friends.” After selecting their concern, a list of primary and related offices on- and/or off-campus are presented.  Students can easily email each office from the application or use the GoogleMaps feature to get them to that particular department. Students have access to ConcernCenter 24/7/365.

Our clients range from small private liberal arts colleges to some of the nation’s largest public institutions. Traditional four-year universities and community and technical colleges alike turn to Maxient. We count among our client family specialty schools for the arts, aeronautics, health sciences, military, and even two that float around the world on boats! Many of our schools are individual institutions, but we also work within entire state systems and districts to help them share data in a FERPA-compliant manner.

We’re the only product that was built from the ground up by practitioners from the field. And it shows. Every member of our team comes from the field and shares that desire. The challenges facing student affairs professionals have never been greater. Consider the reporting and recordkeeping challenges you face, learn more about what we offer below, and let’s see if Maxient could improve operations on your campus!

 

 

The NCHERM Group, LLC

The NCHERM Group is  a law and consulting practice dedicated to best practices for campus health and safety. The NCHERM Group is a repository for systems-level approaches and models that will enhance and advance your campus risk management and preventive law efforts. The NCHERM Group emphasizes best practices for policy, training, and education programming as proactive risk management. The NCHERM Group specializes in advancing culture change strategies and problem-solving for the tough wellness, compliance, and liability issues colleges and universities face today. When you engage our services, you benefit from the collective wisdom, experience and constant collaboration of our more than 25 consultants.

atixa logo no wording
Association of Title IX Administrators

ATIXA provides a professional association for school and college Title IX Coordinators and administrators who are interested in serving their districts and campuses more effectively. Since 1972, Title IX has proved to be an increasingly powerful leveling tool, helping to advance gender equity in schools and colleges.

Hotel

The 2018 NaBITA Conference and Campus Threat Management Institute will be held at the Westin Riverwalk, San Antonio.

WestinExteriorJPG WestinRoomJPG WestinRestaurantJPG The Westin_Lobby TheWestin_Pool

NaBITA has blocked rooms at the conference hotel, The Westin Riverwalk, San Antonio.

The NaBITA discounted room block closes on October 11, 2018. Reservations made after October 11th will be subject to the going rate and based on availability. Please make your reservations early.

420 W Market Street
San Antonio, TX 78205
888-627-8396

Block rate per night (evenings of November 3rd to November 10th)

Single Double
Run of House  209.00  209.00

Click here to make your reservations online.

Please note that the room block prices exclude the tax of 16.75%.

Reservations made through a 3rd party service or website (Expedia, Travelocity, etc) are outside of the room block and are not subject to any benefits or commissions afforded to the block.

Valet parking at the Westin Riverwalk is $39.00 per day plus tax.

Airport and Ground Transportation

AIRPORT

The San Antonio International Airport (SAT) is a 15-minute ride from the Westin. For more information, please visit http://www.sanantonio.gov/sat.

LOCAL TRANSPORTATION

Advantage Rent A Car is offering NaBITA attendees an additional 10% savings through its website at http://www2.advantage.com, by calling our toll free reservation line at 800-777-5500 or by clicking here. Please refer to discount code CD036E6EFF. Rates are valid at any Advantage Texas location.

Guests with Special Needs

For attendees that require ADA accommodations or meal accommodations based on medical or religious requirements, please contact conference@nabita.org.

Refund Policy

NaBITA understands that circumstances change and events may arise that prohibit your ability to attend an event after you have registered. NaBITA will allow another individual from your institution to attend in your place OR you may attend a future NaBITA event with an equivalent registration rate. If you do not wish to send someone in your place or attend a future training event, your registration will only be refunded based on the schedule below.

Registration cancellation by June 30, 2018 = 100% refund

Registration cancellation by July 28, 2018 = 75% refund

Registration cancellation by August 25, 2018 = 50% refund

Registration cancellation by September 22, 2018 = 25% refund

Registration cancellation after September 22, 2018 = no refunds

For more information on the NaBITA Annual Conference and Campus Threat Management Institute, please contact conference@nabita.org, or via phone, at 484-321-3651.