Announcing the 9th Annual NaBITA Conference
And the 8th Annual NaBITA Campus Threat Management Institute

November 13–17, 2017
The Westin Riverwalk, San Antonio
in San Antonio, TX

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I wanted to express my sincerest gratitude for all the hard work and planning that culminated in the NaBITA conference this past November. As a new member of our crisis team,  the conference proved to be invaluable; I was able to put into practice the tools and teachings immediately upon my return. The entire team did a fantastic job; please pass along my sincerest thanks!
– a 2016 Conference attendee

A Message from the Conference Committee
Important Dates and Deadlines
2017 Conference Schedule
Keynote Speaker and Session
Featured Speakers
Featured Speaker Sessions
Concurrent Speaker Sessions
Roundtable Discussions
Closing Panel Information
Optional Theme Dinners
The Doctor Is In
2017 Campus Threat Management Institute
Pre-Conference Sessions
Conference Registration
Institute Registration
Scholarship Opportunity
Awards
Call for Programs
Conference Sponsor and Exhibitor Information
2017 NaBITA Annual Conference Sponsors and Exhibitors
Hotel
Airport and Ground Transportation
NaBITA Response Response to the California Ban on Travel to Texas
Guests with Special Needs
Refund Policy

A Message from the Conference Committee…

Now in its ninth year, the Annual NaBITA Conference and Campus Threat Management Institute is the leading conference in the field of higher education threat assessment and behavioral intervention. Each year the conference provides valuable, substantive, sustaining, and energizing dialogue for professionals from various disciplines who are engaged in the essential function of behavioral intervention in schools, on college campuses, and in corporations and organizations.

Our goal is to create safer campus and workplace environments where development, education, and caring intervention are fostered and encouraged. We welcome you to attend our conference and learn more about its history of mutual support and shared learning.

In 2009, NaBITA held its 1st Annual Conference a mere 11 months after the organization first launched and in the midst of a struggling economy. With the support of our membership and the generosity of the University of Texas at San Antonio, we hosted a successful conference for over 150 attendees. In 2010, NaBITA was fortunate to find a partner and new host site in Tulane University in New Orleans. Tulane hosted more than 200 participants for our second conference and the 1st NaBITA Campus Threat Manager Certification Course. By 2011, NaBITA’s membership base had doubled, and the conference moved to a resort hotel: The Hyatt Regency Coconut Point Resort & Spa in Bonita Springs, Florida, where we remained for 4 years, through our 6th Annual Conference in 2014.

In 2015, NaBITA decided to head west and hosted its largest conference to date, with over 450 attendees, at The Westin Riverwalk San Antonio. Conference attendees and faculty alike enjoyed the city of San Antonio so much that NaBITA has decided to remain in San Antonio through 2018. This year’s NaBITA Conference will be held at The Westin Riverwalk, San Antonio.

The Conference will have three types of presentation formats: featured speakers, concurrent sessions, and roundtables. Featured speakers have been invited to present by the conference committee based on the prominence of their work and contribution to the thought, theory, practice and evolution of behavioral intervention efforts. Some of your old favorites are back, and we have invited some new faces as well. Their topics have been assigned to them, with the intention of creating a dynamic and progressive curriculum for participants.

The conference committee also recognizes that expertise exists beyond those invited to share their work, so we have again slated concurrent sessions so that you may share your promising models, valuable experience, and professional expertise with conference participants.

Finally, we recognize that learning is most powerful when participants have the opportunity to reflect on newly learned content and apply the concepts shared at a conference, so we have designed roundtables to interactively engage participants. Attendees will be able to join roundtables based on a particular theme and facilitated by the featured presenters based on topics of interest to you.

In addition to offering three types of presentations, the NaBITA conference is designed to allow participants to follow presentations in three tracks based on an individual level of sophistication. Conference content will be relevant to you whether you are just beginning a team, have one already established, or have been doing behavioral intervention for years. The three tracks are Basic, Intermediate and Advanced. Follow one track, or jump around to topics that interest you. Participants can also choose presentations based on a particular area of interest: mental health, law enforcement, legal issues, case management, community colleges, and assessment and management of the BIT.

Back again this year is the NaBITA Campus Threat Management Institute. We have space for 125 attendees in this extended event that includes its own track during the regular conference sessions plus an additional two days of training after the larger conference ends.

Whether your goal is to prevent violence, support individuals with disabilities, empower the success of those suffering from mental health challenges, conduct comprehensive threat assessments, or assist those in crisis, the 9th Annual NaBITA Conference and Campus Threat Management Institute joins you in common purpose and exploration of best practices.

We hope to see you this November in San Antonio!

Cordially,

Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., Executive Director
Samantha Dutill, Conference Chair
Jen Taylor, Senior Program Coordinator, Conference Co-Chair
Beth Trandahl, Events and Membership Coordinator, Conference Committee Member

Important Dates and Deadlines

Registration Opens: February 15, 2017
Call for Programs Opens: February 17, 2017
Call for Programs Due: July 28, 2017
Scholarship Application Deadline: August 1, 2017
Early Bird Registration Closes: September 8, 2017
Hotel Room Block Closes: October 19, 2017
Regular Registration Closes: November 3, 2017

2017 Conference Schedule

The below schedule is subject to change based on keynote, panel and featured speaker schedules. The 2017 NaBITA Conference website will be updated with any changes to reflect current session and conference schedules.

Monday, November 13, 2017

  • 9:00am to 12:00pm
    • Morning pre-conference session. Requires separate registration. Click here for more information.
  • 1:00pm to 4:00pm
    • Afternoon pre-conference session options. Requires separate registration. Click here for more information.
  • 7:00pm to 8:30pm
    • Opening Keynote
  • 8:30pm to 9:30pm
    • Welcome Reception

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

  • 7:30am to 8:30am
    • Continental Breakfast
  • 8:30am to 9:45am
    • Concurrent Session 1
  • 10:00am to 11:30am
    • Featured Speakers Session A
  • 11:30am to 1:00pm
    • Lunch break
  • 1:00pm to 2:15pm
    • Concurrent Session 2
  • 2:30pm to 3:30pm
    • Roundtable Discussions
  • 3:30pm to 4:00pm
    • Snack Break
  • 4:00pm to 5:30pm
    • Featured Speakers Session B
  • 7:00pm
    • Optional Theme Dinners

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

  • 7:30am to 8:30am
    • Coffee service
  • 8:30am to 9:45am
    • Concurrent Session 3
  • 10:00am to 11:30am
    • Featured Session C
  • 11:45am to 1:15pm
    • Buffet Lunch and Closing Panel: State of the BIT

Keynote Speaker

NaBITA is pleased to welcome Adam Lankford, Ph.D.

Lankford-headshot

Adam Lankford is a criminology professor at The University of Alabama.

He conducts research on many types of social deviance and criminal behavior, including mass murder, mass shootings, and terrorism.

Dr. Lankford is the author of two books and has published articles in numerous peer-reviewed journals. He has also written for The New York Times, Foreign Policy, Wired, The Daily Beast, New Scientist, The Mail on Sunday, Scientific American, and The Huffington Post. 

Dr. Lankford’s research has been featured by CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, BBC World News, The New York Times, The New Yorker, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times, Newsweek, Time, USA Today, NPR, BBC Radio, CBS Radio, and many other national and international outlets.

From 2003 to 2008, he helped coordinate Senior Executive Anti-Terrorism Forums for high-ranking foreign military and security personnel in conjunction with the U.S. State Department’s Anti-Terrorism Assistance program. During this period, ATA hosted delegations from Armenia, Colombia, Georgia, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Morocco, Pakistan, Tunisia, the United Arab Emirates, and Uzbekistan.

Dr. Lankford received his Ph.D. and M.S. in Justice, Law & Society from American University in Washington, DC and his B.A. in English from Haverford College outside Philadelphia, PA.

Opening Keynote

Detecting Suicidal Motives and Attack Intentions Among Mass Shooters and Suicide Terrorists in the United States
Presented by Adam Lankford, Ph.D., Criminology Professor, University of Alabama

Suicide has reached a 30-year high in the United States, and it is the second leading cause of death for 15 to 34 year-olds. Although most suicides are nonviolent, mass shootings and suicide terrorism often involve suicidal individuals as well. To more effectively prevent these attacks, practitioners should bolster their understandings of the challenges posed by individual and familial denial, doctor avoidance, and social and religious stigmas. It is also critical to recognize the complex interaction of individual, social, and situational factors that produces suicidal motives in many of these cases. In addition, there are other common psychological and behavioral tendencies among mass shooters and suicide terrorists that can be recognized in advance. Practitioners should consider how to optimally balance the potential costs of reporting “false positives” with the consequences of not acting until it is too late. By applying the most recent scientific findings on this subject, we may be able to save the lives of both the victims and the would-be attackers themselves.

Featured Speakers

The 2017 NaBITA Annual Conference features presenters chosen for their topical expertise by the conference committee. The conference committee also invites those with promising models, valuable experience and professional expertise to share your knowledge in our concurrent sessions.

  • Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., NaBITA Executive Director; Senior Executive Vice President for Professional Program Development, The NCHERM Group, LLC
  • W. Scott Lewis, J.D., NaBITA Past-President; Partner, The NCHERM Group, LLC
  • Saundra K. Schuster, J.D., Partner, The NCHERM Group, LLC and NaBITA Past-President
  • Daniel C. Swinton, J.D., Ed.D., Managing Partner, The NCHERM Group, LLC
  • Candice Johnston, Ed.D., Certified Emotional Intelligence Consultant, Associate Dean of Students, University of North Carolina Wilmington
  • Amy Murphy, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, Angelo State University
  • Joseph Allen, Ed.D., Director, Student Services, National University; Affiliated Consultant, The NCHERM Group, LLC
  • Aaron “Chip” Reese, Ed.D., Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students, Columbus State University, NaBITA Past-President
  • Adrian Rodriguez, Vice President, Student Development Services, Tarrant County College Trinity River Campus
  • Laura Ulmer, M.Ed., Director of Student Conduct & Academic Integrity, Old Dominion University
  • Charles Bonnet, Captain, The University of Texas at Austin Police Department
  • Vivian Benavices, Detective, The University of Texas at Austin Police Department
  • Paul Maslyk, M.A., Inspector, The University of Texas System Police

Featured Speaker Sessions

Featured Speaker Session A

Emotional Intelligence for Professionals Working with High-Risk Individuals and Situations
Presented by Candice Johnston, Ed.D., Certified Emotional Intelligence Consultant; Associate Dean of Students, University of North Carolina Wilmington

Emotional intelligence is a powerful skill set professionals can leverage when managing threat assessment, behavioral intervention, and/or violence prevention. Assisting others while managing complex circumstances, constituencies, and behavioral issues is a challenging proposition for the best professional.  How can we be effective while not paying a high personal or professional cost as direct service professional? Although there are multiple models of emotional intelligence, we will examine the Bar-On Model and explore reliable strategies for enhancing emotional intelligence skills.  The session will focus on emotional intelligence from the professional’s perspective as well as how emotional intelligence can be a powerful tool to assist others. Emotional intelligence is a set of 15 skills; each can be cultivated and further developed regardless of age and experience level.  By utilizing the non-judgmental terms for each of the skills, professionals are better equipped to have difficult conversations about challenging decisions, intent, and behavioral impact.

Build Your BIT
Presented by Joseph Allen, Ed.D., Director, Student Services, National University; Amy Murphy, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, Angelo State University; Aaron “Chip” Reese, Ed.D., Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students, Columbus State University, NaBITA Past-President; Adrian Rodriguez, Vice President, Student Development Services, Tarrant County College Trinity River Campus; and Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., Executive Director of NaBITA; Senior Vice President for Professional Program Development, The NCHERM Group, LLC

Join members of NaBITA’s Advisory Board and BIT chairs from campuses across the country as they share best practices and approaches on how to successfully build a Behavioral Intervention Team from the ground up. Whether you are a new team or looking for some advice to make your process truly shine, this session is for you. The panel will share their hard-won insights from developing teams on community college, online and four-year campuses and discuss issues related to marketing, advertising, building a budget, team communication, FERPA and confidetial law, the role of clinical staff on the BIT, record-keeping, and how to develop an effective team policy and procedure manual.

Featured Speaker Session B

Title IX and BIT: Offering Support Services for the Accused

Presented by Laura Ulmer, M.Ed., Director of Student Conduct & Academic Integrity, Old Dominion University; Daniel Swinton, J.D., Ed.D., Managing Partner, The NCHERM Group, LLC

Working with and providing support for the accused in a Title IX investigation and resolution process is an essential part of a well-balanced and appropriate response. NaBITA has long been a leader in advocating for Behavioral Intervention Teams to be an integral part of the planning and coordination of the college’s response and support-based mechanisms for both accuser and accused in these difficult cases. Many campuses are just now beginning to understand their obligation to protect the educational experience and personal dignity of the student being accused of a Title IX violation, while doing the same for the accuser. Speakers will highlight that institutions should treat both accuser and accused in the Title IX process with equal dignity, fairness, equity and approach each allegation impartially. Speakers will share examples and case studies reflecting that identical support is not required, rather, what is fair and appropriate based on the individualized circumstances of the accuser or the accused. There will also be significant discussion of the new Interim Guide and September 22, 2017 Dear Colleague Letter from the Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, much of which highlights fairness and support for the accused.

This program will help members of the BIT, campus conduct, and Title IX processes find balance and serve and protect both students involved in sexual assault cases. This workshop will explore common issues that arise in working with and supporting the accused both during the investigation and resolution process and beyond. The presenters will look through multiple lenses, including the legal and regulatory demands of Title IX, Clery/VAWA, the personal toll an accusation of assault has on the accused, their family, the mental health and related issues common in such situations may struggle through, and how a BIT can be of most help during the Title IX process or other disciplinary processes.

Participants in this session will be encouraged to engage in conversation and look at applying best practices on their own campus. 

BIT and Section 504/ADA

Presented by Saundra K. Schuster, J.D., Partner, The NCHERM Group, LLC and NaBITA Past-President

Public and private colleges are subject to oversight by the courts and OCR for disability-related discrimination.  Students with mental health issues often exhibit behavior that creates concerns and are reported to your BIT.  Students with mental health issues are likely to have a qualifying disability either by diagnosis and documentation, or by our regarding the student as such.  In these cases, the student is protected by both 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and ADA.  This session addresses the requirements and contours of disability issues as it impacts your BIT and conduct. This program explores the legal and best practice implications of the Section 504 Direct Threat standard and the way in which it impacts BIT-based decisions.  It will also address the philosophical implications of separating versus retaining students who have actual mental health and or disability conditions.

Behavioral Intervention for Online Learning
Presented by Amy Murphy, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, Angelo State University; Joseph Allen, Ed.D., Director, Student Services, National University; and Josh Gunn, Ph.D., NaBITA Advisory Board; Assistant Dean & Executive Director, Counseling and Psychological Services at Kennesaw State University; Past President ACCA

In today’s educational systems, learning and interaction occur not just in face-to-face settings, but also online and in an array of distance learning platforms. This creates a challenge for BITs to identify online behaviors of concern and provide timely and effective interventions. Dr. Joseph Allen and Dr. Amy Murphy will share their experience as online faculty, student affairs administrators, and NaBITA Advisory Board Members to help participants consider how BITs can engage with online faculty and students. We will discuss current technology and ways to stop, prevent the reoccurrence of, and to mitigate the impact these behaviors have on your community. This session will explore unique characteristics of online learners and online learning environments and how the primary activities of the BIT can be modified when distance and technology are contributing factors.

Featured Speaker Session C

Legal Update and Review of Recent Acts of Violence
Presented by Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., Executive Director, NaBITA; Senior Vice President for Professional Program Development, The NCHERM Group, LLC; and W. Scott Lewis, J.D., NaBITA Past-President; Partner, The NCHERM Group, LLC

This session will review key legal cases that occurred during 2016-2017. These cases have implications for Behavioral Intervention Teams, Campus Law Enforcement, Disability Services, Counseling & Health Services and Student Conduct. A review of recent acts of violence will include high profile attacks to provide BIT professionals essential insight and “lessons learned” to move forward with their own prevention and intervention efforts.

Campus Suicide: A Student’s Impact on UT Austin and Lessons Learned

Presented by Charles Bonnet, Captain, The University of Texas at Austin Police Department; Vivian Benavides, Detective, The University of Texas at Austin Police Department; and Paul Maslyk, M.A., Inspector, The University of Texas System Police

Detective Benavides, Captain Bonnet, and Inspector Maslyk, The University of Texas Police, will discuss the facts and circumstances surrounding the on-campus suicide by a university student.  On September 28th, 2010, a student put on a ski mask and walked through campus firing an AK-47 at buildings and into the air, before entering a library and using the rifle to take his own life.  The discussion will focus on how the student was able to avoid any detection or intervention by peers or campus resources, how the circumstances affected the campus community, and lessons learned with respect to UTPD and its partnership with campus assessment teams.

Concurrent Speaker Sessions

Concurrent Session One

Danger of the Unknown: Making Campus Safer Through Communication and Collaboration
Presented by Charles Bonnet, B.A., Captain, The University of Texas at Austin Police, Vivian Benavides, Detective, The University of Texas at Austin Police, and Paul Maslyk, M.A., Inspector, The University of Texas System Police

This session is intended for licensed law enforcement officers only (credentials will be checked at entry). Captain Bonnet, Detective Benavides and Inspector Maslyk, The University of Texas Police, will discuss three critical incidents at the University of Texas at Austin, their impact on the Police Department and University at large, and lessons learned from a law enforcement and assessment/intervention standpoint.

A Collaborative Approach to Addressing Mental Health at a Small Campus: Proactive and Reactive Protocols
Presented by Tatiana Sifri, Director of Dyson Wellness Center, North Central College and Kevin McCarthy, Associate Dean of Students, North Central College

Nationally, student mental health issues continue to increase in severity and volume with each academic year. One of the most important and challenging aspects in assisting students both proactively and in response to mental health crisis is ensuring a healthy and well-integrated relationship between the Student Affairs Office and the Counseling/Medical Center. As North Central College, a small, Midwestern, liberal arts college, begins the fourth year maintaining a Behavioral Intervention Team and new Early Alert Referral system, much was learned over the course of said time. During this session, the presenters will cover what they wish they would have known, the importance of open and regular communication, and will describe successful and collaborative crisis management between multiple areas including the Wellness Center, Dean of Students Office, Residence Life, Campus Safety, Center for Student Success, faculty and students. Both proactive and reactive techniques and protocols will be explored and discussed.

Marketing Safety on Campus: What’s Important to Know and How to Get This Information to Our Community
Presented by Rick Parfitt, M.A., CTM, Chief of Police, Florida SouthWestern State College

Keeping campus communities safe is not what it used to be. How should one get the information out about how students (and employees) can protect themselves from harm, and understand what behavior they should be concerned about? How do administrators market safety on campus so that students will find, understand, and use information?

Suicidal Students on Campus: Legal Liability Management and BIT
Presented by Carolyn Reinach Wolf, Esq., J.D., M.S., MBA, Executive Partner and Director of the Mental Health Law Department, Abrams, Fensterman, Fensterman, Eisman, Formato, Ferrara,Wolf & Carone, LLP

When it comes to managing suicidal students on campus, there are numerous legal, policy and confidentiality questions, among others. This session is Part 3 of a discussion which began at the 2015 NaBITA Conference and continued in 2016, of the appropriate campus response to student suicide or a suicide attempt on a college campus through the use of a case study. The presenter will explore the role of Behavioral Intervention Teams and how to ensure compliance with relevant legislation (Affordable Care Act, ADA, FERPA, HIPAA, etc.), help students in need and keep the campus secure. The session will discuss case law on legal liability of the college/university for a student’s suicide including an overview of the “special relationship” requirement. Finally, the session will review risk management practices such as parental notification and suicide prevention programs. Due to the high volume of attendees and positive response to the session at previous conferences, this is a review and then continuation of that program.

Summary and Analysis of Case Management in Higher Education
Presented by Jamie Molnar, M.App.Psych., LMHC, Students of Concern Case Manager, University of South Florida Saint Petersburg, Mona Dugo, LCSW, Senior Associate Dean of Students, Northwestern University, and Ben Falter, M.Ed., Senior Student Affairs Case Manager, San Jose State University

This presentation is a summary and analysis of the HECMA (Higher Education Case Management Association) 2017 Biennial Survey Membership Report. The report is a review of case management data collected from 252 individual respondents from institutions across the United States and Canada, and was the largest HECMA membership survey to date. In this presentation the presenters will discuss key findings and detail the significant growth in the area of case management and BIT procedures. For campuses considering adding case management services or increasing or reviewing current services, there will be a discussion on the evidence supporting the strong need for clear role definition, including how and where both case management positions and BIT teams operate within the landscape of higher education. Also provided are best practice recommendations on case management and BITS, Title IX, as well as key foundational components of case management programs.

A Care Team’s Five Year Case Summary and Implications for Our Work
Presented by Laura Ulmer, Ph.D., Director of Student Conduct & Academic Integrity, Old Dominion University

This presentation is based on dissertation research about a five year case summary for the Student Care Team (SCT) at the University of Louisville. Through an application of Astin’s (1991) Input-Environment-Output Model of Assessment, participants will understand the method used to articulate the demographic profile and nature of referrals to the SCT, as well as the results of the research regarding academic success. This program is designed to assist team members in the creation of a plan for this type of assessment and how the results impact our work.

Concurrent Session Two

Managing Parental Involvement: Maintaining Control of the Behavioral Intervention Process
Presented by Christopher Summerlin, Ph.D., Assistant Dean of Students for Behavioral Case Management, Kennesaw State University

Behavioral intervention often focuses on the students role in providing needed support and resources during difficult times. However, the parents’ role and desire to be involved can lead to issues in providing proper support for the student. This program will examine a case of extreme parental involvement causing problems on campus and how to manage the case within a behavioral response team.

How Integration of the Student Primary Case Clinic and Student Counseling Services Can Benefit a Behavioral Intervention Team
Presented by Christina Cox-Leisinger, Ph.D., Assistant Vice President, Student Affairs, West Texas A&M University and Dayne Schertler, Director, Student Counseling Services, West Texas A&M University

The relationship between a student’s health and counseling services is important to understand and can be critical to a student’s success at an institution. Taking a more integrated approach may provide the best foundation for providing holistic care to students. West Texas A&M University is the only school in the Texas A&M System to house the position of Health Integration Specialist. Join the presenters to learn how this position is working at this university and how it can benefit a BIT.

Behavioral Intervention and Athletics: A Roadmap to Success for Our Students
Presented by Susanne Fenske, Ph.D., Clarion University, Wendy Snodgrass, D.Ed., Clarion University, and Matt Shaffer, M.A., Clarion University

While the concerns of student athletes stand out because of the unique nature of their involvement on campus, many of the problems aren’t necessarily all that different from other students. However, they are often compounded by the additional stressors the students encounter due to the demands of their athletic involvement. Recognizing and honoring the unique relationship the students have with their coaching staff is a key element to successful intervention and one behavioral intervention team needs to be very aware of. In this session, the presenters will discuss the unique problems student athletes present, the coach-athlete relationship, and preventative measures BITs can take to get out in front of issues with student athletes.

Called to Task: Crucial Takeaways from Recent Campus Tragedies
Presented by Erin Halligan-Avery, Ph.D., Director, Health and Promotion Wellness Education at Rochester Institute of Technology

When crisis strikes an institution of higher education, particularly one that involves human tragedy, the many campus units will discover an uncommon confluence of shared goals, strained resources, and challenging collaborations with new partners. While risk awareness and skill-building may equip campuses to be generally prepared, most campuses are unprepared for the intense challenges at the micro level that will unexpectedly permeate campus operations. Together, administrators will become better equipped to persevere.

Who’s Doing the Work? Faculty Involvement on the BIT
Presented by Mary R. McNaughton-Cassill, Ph.D., Professor, University of Texas – San Antonio, Anne L. Jimenez, M.A., Associate Dean and Director, Student Conduct and Community Standards, University of Texas – San Antonio, Tom Calucci, Lieutenant, Police Department, University of Texas – San Antonio, and Donna Edmondson, M.A., Ombudsperson, Academic Affairs, University of Texas – San Antonio

With the increasing expectations placed on universities to increase the efficacy of their mental health efforts, many campuses have implemented BIT or CARE teams. However, faculty are often overlooked as a critical contributor to BITs; their involvement does not have to end with a report to the BIT. This session will review collaborative efforts to assist faculty in recognizing and responding appropriately to distressed students, thereby reducing teaching stress, enhancing student academic performance, mitigating risks, and engaging in more constructive interactions with students.

Case Studies in Mental Hygiene Arrests
Presented by Eileen Daniel, D.Ed, Vice Provost for Academic Affairs, SUNY Brockport and Karen Logsdon, Ph.D., Assistant to the Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Affairs, SUNY Brockport

The current generation of college students is often perceived to be one of the mentally “sickest” and most at risk in recent memory. While there is debate about whether today’s students are actually sicker than previous generations, they are clearly presenting with complicated problems and needs. These problems have challenged college administrators, faculty, staff, and counselors, who are often caught between overreacting to certain situations and underreacting to others (Rosenbaum & Liebert, 2015). Of major concern is the relationship between mental health issues and violence on college campuses. A study of over 3,900 college students from the National Epidemiological Study on Alcohol and Related Consequences revealed that a substantial portion of college students (approximately 21% of students report at least one violent act) engage in various types violent behavior, either self-inflicted or harm to others. In addition, more than 36% of college students have at least one diagnosable psychiatric disorder. Finally, the prevalence of one or more psychiatric disorders significantly increased the odds of violent behavior within the college student sample (Schwartz, Beaver & Barnes, 2015). New York State’s Mental Hygiene Law’s standard allows any peace officer to take into custody any person who appears to be mentally ill and is conducting him or herself in a manner which is likely to result in serious harm to the person or others (NYS, 1989). Based on this law, students displaying these behaviors may be subjected to a mental hygiene arrest. They are typically treated for a period of time and then released often to return to a college campus. The conditions for their return tend to vary based on their individual circumstances. This presentation focuses on two case studies involving students who were referred to the Student Behavioral Consultant Team with concerns related to their return to campus following a mental hygiene arrest (MHA). Strategies and techniques used to manage these ongoing concerns will be addressed. Presenters will acknowledge limited research in the literature and guidance from national associations pertaining to the issues facing return to campus following a MHA.

Concurrent Session Three

Role of Legal Counsel on Behavioral Intervention Teams
Presented by Carolyn Reinach Wolf, Esq., J.D., M.S., MBA, Executive Partner and Director of the Mental Health Law Department,Abrams, Fensterman, Fensterman, Eisman, Formato, Ferrara,Wolf & Carone, LLP

This session will discuss the role of legal counsel as a member of the Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) in the higher education setting as well as in the workplace setting. First, we will differentiate the roles of general counsel and risk management personnel from the role of legal counsel on a BIT. We will then explore the benefits of including legal counsel as a member of the BIT, BIT advisor, and how to best use their skills and knowledge to the advantage of the BIT. We will conclude by discussing some challenges of having legal counsel on the BIT, including attorney-client privilege issues and liability concerns.

Developing a Death Protocol for Your Campus
Presented by Susanne Fenske, Ph.D., Vice President for Student Affairs, Clarion University, Thomas Crissman, M.A., LPC, Student Support Assistant, Clarion University, Jason Hendershot, M.A., Chief of Police, Clarion University, and Matt Shaffer, M.A., Director of Judicial Affairs, Clarion University

This presentation will describe the introduction of a comprehensive death protocol at a state school in rural Pennsylvania. During this discussion, the presenters will review the circumstance surrounding the rationale for adoption of the death protocol, implementing the Death protocol, and utilizing it effectively for the first time in their institution, as well as a question and answer on how to implement it at other institutions.

Recognizing Similarities Between Domestic School Shooters and Extremist Lone Wolves Toward Preventing Tragedy in the U.S. and Abroad
Presented by Lisa Pescara-Kovach, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Educational Psychology, Director, Center for Education in Targeted Violence & Suicide, University of Toledo 

Behavioral Intervention Teams are making strides in recognizing those at risk of perpetrating acts of targeted violence in K-12 and colleges/universities. Thought patterns and behaviors among those presenting greatest risk of targeted violence parallel individuals who have carried out extremist lone wolf attacks in the U.S. and abroad. This session identifies commonalities toward prevention of future tragedies.

You “CARE” About Student Support, But How Do You Get Others in Your Institution Engaged and Committed to Use Your Service?
Presented by Heidi Saller, M.S.Ed, Associate Director, CARE Network, University of Rochester, Erin Halligan-Avery, Ph.D., Director, Health and Promotion Wellness Education at Rochester Institute of Technology and Niki Pizzutelli, M.S., Assistant Director, CARE Network, University of Rochester

The University of Rochester’s campus community knows how to “CARE” for students in distress through marketing efforts. How does a current marketing plan impact the success of that program? Come by for a fun and interactive presentation to learn more about the journey of CARE’s marketing over the past seven years and walk away with tangible practices to enhance marketing.

Maximizing Meetings: The Use of Motivational Interviewing to Increase Behavior Change and Adherence
Presented by Aaron Grusonik, MA, PsyD, Associate Dean of Students, Director of Safety and Welfare, Montana State University

Motivation Interviewing (MI) is a form of counseling that was developed in the early 1990’s as a revolutionary way of treating drug and alcohol addiction. Since its creation, MI has shown to be useful in multiple areas having to do with behavior change and adherence. This session will teach basic MI philosophies and techniques. Examples and discussion will explain how this can be used in behavior intervention and assessment.

Safety, Connections, Managing Emotions: Creating a Trauma-Informed Campus
Presented by Raquelle Solon, Business Solutions Engineer, FEI Behavioral Health

Ever wonder why people make the decisions they do? In many instances, the answer is unexpected: trauma. Understanding there’s a connection between the trauma people have experienced and the behavior they exhibit is key to approaching interactions on campus, especially potentially dangerous situations. A trauma-informed approach to crisis intervention is key to minimizing threats or acts of violence, creating healthy, respectful relationships among faculty,staff and students. This session will discuss types of trauma, trauma-informed care, and the best practice of incorporating this approach in order to prevent violence on campus, with the overall goal being to not cause re-traumatization with our interventions.

Roundtable Discussions

Roundtables are an opportunity for focused, informal conversation with colleagues who are working through many of the same issues on their own campuses.

  1. Campus Carry/Guns on Campus
  2. Burnout and Stress
  3. Community Colleges and BITs
  4. Role of the Counselor on the BIT
  5. BIT Management Strategies
  6. FERPA, Clery & HIPAA
  7. The iMatter! Toolkit

Closing Panel Information

A Window into BIT

What does a Behavioral Intervention Team meeting look like? How do counseling, conduct, and residential life talk together about cases? What does the NaBITA rubric look like in action?  When should an assessment be required? At what point should other assessment tools be utilized? How are action plans developed? In what order are cases discussed? How is documentation handled? How are conflicts between departments resolved? How can a BIT successfully function on a tight budget?

At the 2014 NaBITA Conference, members of NaBITA’s Advisory Board addressed these questions and more via a live demonstration of how a hypothetical BIT might function at a four-year, residential institution. This session was recorded, and over the last three years, thousands have watched and learned from NaBITA’s A Window into BIT video. This year NaBITA is offering a companion demonstration, with members of the Advisory Board playing the parts of conduct officers, department chairs, legal counsel, and other administrative staff at a two-year community college. However, this time around the team will have less resources to work with and we will demonstrate the importance of working with the community, addressing classroom disruption early and often, and how to manage an uncooperative BIT member. Join us as we bring together the conference themes and workshops in this live demonstration*.

* This session will be filmed

Optional Theme Dinners

NaBITA is proud to facilitate an opportunity for conference attendees to network and engage in open dialogue about pressing issues facing behavioral intervention teams. More information and a sign-up sheet will be available on-site.

THEMES: Case Management, Legal Issues, Law Enforcement, Counseling, Student Conduct, Campus SaVE/Title IX, Community Colleges

WHAT: Dinners on your own by area of interest

WHEN: Tuesday, November 14 at 7pm

WHERE: Reservations have been made at various area restaurants

*Please note that transportation and payment for meals is the responsibility of theme dinner participants. 

The Doctor Is In

Do you have an inquiry specific to the operations of your campus team? Are you looking for some individual time with a national expert in behavioral intervention and threat assessment? Do you have “just a quick question” on how to proceed with a current BIT case? Back by popular demand, NaBITA presents The Doctor Is In, a unique opportunity for conference attendees to sign-up for private Q&A time with NaBITA’s leadership to help answer some of your most pressing questions. Sign up on-site at the conference registration table for a 20 minute-session with a BIT expert! Please note that meeting slots are on a first-come, first-served basis and require you to sign up in advance. Please direct any inquiries regarding The Doctor Is In to Megan BirsterDirector of Marketing Outreach & Business Development, at (610) 993-0229 ext. 1015.

2017 Campus Threat Management Institute

Each year, NaBITA strives to expand programmatic events for our members. In 2010, we created the first NaBITA Campus Threat Management Institute, allowing participants to attain a Campus Threat Manager Certificate of Completion after four days of engaging, interactive training. In 2011, Institute attendance increased and even more attendees benefitted from more intense interaction with our faculty. We saw continued growth in 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, and again in 2016.

The NaBITA Institute offers an intense level of depth and training for those charged with campus behavioral intervention and threat assessment responsibilities. One of the benefits of the Campus Threat Management Institute is a small faculty:student ratio, with a limit of 125 attendees. Institute registration is open to both NaBITA members and non-members.

Dates:  November 13 – November 17, 2017 (Monday evening to Friday afternoon). The NaBITA Institute runs concurrently with the NaBITA Annual Conference, and then continues for two additional days. Institute registrants will attend the NaBITA Conference (included in the Institute registration fee), in an optional special track for Institute registrants. As attendance at the conference sessions are required to obtain Campus Threat Management Institute certification, participants are not able to register for only the Wednesday-Friday Institute sessions.

The NaBITA conference begins with the Opening Keynote on Monday, November 13, at 7:00pm. The conference runs until 1:15pm on Wednesday, November 15. The Institute continues for the remainder of Wednesday, November 15, all day on Thursday, November 16, and then concludes at 12:00pm on Friday, November 17, 2017.

Location:  The Westin Riverwalk, San Antonio

Intended Participants

  • Campus behavioral intervention team or campus threat assessment team members, especially team Chairs
  • Campus law enforcement/threat assessment professionals
  • Campus mental health professionals
  • Campus violence risk assessors
  • Case managers

Format

Institute registrants will receive intensive training on behavioral assessment, threat management and violence prevention over four days. The Institute is capped at 125 registrants. With an estimated 9 faculty members, the Institute has a 1:14 faculty/participant ratio, and participants will have individual and small-group opportunities to interact with each of the expert faculty members. Institute registrants will participate in the NaBITA Conference from Monday night to Wednesday afternoon with the option to follow a specially designated track with sessions designed to create a comprehensive four-day training curriculum when combined with the longer, more intensive sessions of the Institute on Wednesday afternoon, Thursday, and Friday morning. Some Featured Speakers for the conference will also serve as Faculty for the Institute.

Institute participants will be assigned to a faculty mentor for the case study roundtable session at the Institute. Attendees who participate in the 2017 Conference and Campus Threat Management Institute will receive a certification of completion from NaBITA. For more information on our Continuing Certification Credit (CCC) program, please click here.

NaBITA Campus Threat Management Institute Schedule

Wednesday, November 15
1:30pm to 4:30pm – Choice of 2 Institute sessions

Thursday, November 16
9:00am to 12:00pm – Choice of 2 Institute sessions
1:00pm-1:35pm – Case study discussions led by Institute faculty
2:00pm-5:00pm – Choice of 2 Institute sessions

Friday, November 17
9:00am to 12:00pm – Choice of 2 Institute sessions

Campus Threat Management Institute Sessions

Institute Session A

Structured Interview Violence Risk Assessment Tool
Presented by Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., Executive Director of NaBITA; Senior Vice President for Professional Program Development, The NCHERM Group, LLC

This training will provide participants with a detailed exploration of risk assessment by behavioral intervention and threat assessment teams. The Structured Interview for Violence Risk Assessment (SIVRA-35) is a thirty-five-item inventory designed by Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., that is used to assist Behavioral Intervention Team members and clinical staff in conducting a more thorough and research-based violence risk assessment. The SIVRA-35 is designed to assist with individuals identified as elevated, severe, or extreme risk by the NaBITA Threat Assessment Tool or using similar methodologies. Participants will review the concepts of structured professional judgment, violence risk factors and review the items used in the SIVRA-35 to assess risk.

Lend a Hand: Mental Health Awareness and Intervention Training
Presented by David J. Denino, LPC, NCC, President-Elect of NaBITA; Director Emeritus, Counseling Services and Adjunct Professor/Clinical Mental Health at Southern CT State University; and Josh Gunn, Ph.D., NaBITA Advisory Board; Assistant Dean & Executive Director, Counseling and Psychological Services at Kennesaw State University; Past President ACCA

The Lend a Hand program offers the opportunity for Campus BITs, student affairs professionals, student conduct officers, faculty, residential life staff, and other members of the campus community to develop awareness and intervention skills in the areas of Depression, Anxiety, Bi-Polar, and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).  Basic information about suicide will be reviewed; the PASS (Prevent Another Student Suicide) pre-con session will explore suicide prevention in more depth.

This program draws from research based approaches to identify and addressing mental health problems on campus, and will focus on the empowerment of individuals to better understand the nature of mental health crisis events and offer intervention and referrals in a caring and supportive manner.

Institute Session B

NaBITA Threat Assessment Tool
Presented by Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., Executive Director of NaBITA; Senior Vice President for Professional Program Development, The NCHERM Group, LLC; and W. Scott Lewis, J.D., NaBITA Past-President; Partner, The NCHERM Group, LLC

This is a comprehensive training on the NaBITA Threat Assessment Tool, which was updated in the spring of 2014. Participants will learn how to use the tool, with four measures of mental health related risk, five generalized risk measures and nine measures for aggression. With this tool, teams can accurately assess the potential for harm to self, harm to others, and harm to facilities/operations/reputation. Once the tool is explained, participants will work through a set of case studies to assess the risks of each, and then to strategically deploy intervention tools to address those risks.

Utilizing Critical Incident Stress Management as Postvention to Stop an Active Shooting and/or Suicide from Leading to Yet Another Tragedy
Presented by Lisa Pescara-Kovach, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Educational Psychology and Director of the Center for Education in Targeted Violence and Suicide, The University of Toledo; and David J. Denino, LPC, NCC, President-Elect of NaBITA; Director Emeritus, Counseling Services and Adjunct Professor/Clinical Mental Health at Southern CT State University

Behavioral Intervention Teams are excellent resources, as they assess a potential threat with the goal of preventing violence and, if a threat is identified, engage in the process of creating a case management plan.  If we also implement active shooter response and survival training in all K-12 districts, institutions of higher education, and  workplaces, we are covering prevention via threat assessment, intervention via case management, and active response.

However, what is often lacking is postvention in which an institution prepares for the aftermath of a situational crisis, such as a mass shooting, suicide, death of a classmate or coworker. The Mitchell Model of Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) has been adopted by teams in the U.S., Canada, Italy, Portugal and other countries.

Critical Incident Stress Management involves debriefing, defusing, and referral as steps to assist first responders and survivors of extreme situational crises. This approach lessens the confusion, stress, and trauma that often lead to permanent post-incident mental health issues – including suicide – associated with being on scene during or after an active shooting or other critical incident.

Institute Session C

Managing Threat on Social Media through a Free Speech and Violence Risk Lens
Presented by Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., Executive Director of NaBITA; Senior Vice President for Professional Program Development, The NCHERM Group, LLC; and W. Scott Lewis, J.D., NaBITA Past-President; Partner, The NCHERM Group, LLC

Join Brian Van Brunt and Scott Lewis as they discuss the intersection of free speech and violence risk assessment related to social media. This interactive workshop will walk you through several engaging case studies with a focus on intervention and management strategies, at both residential and non-residential colleges and universities. Participants should bring an understanding of the NaBITA Threat Assessment Tool and SIVRA-35 to conceptualize the risk in a research-based fashion, before diving into the management hurdles created by an individual’s free speech and the potential threat to the community.

 

Case Management in Higher Education: An Overview of the Field and Exploration of How to Apply Specific Case Management Practices
Presented by Makenzie Schiemann, Director, Student Outreach and Support; Director, Center for Victim Advocacy; Chair, Students of Concern Team, University of South Florida Tampa; and Jamie Molnar, LMHC, SOCAT Case Manager, Chair, Students of Concern Assistance Team, University of South Florida Saint Petersburg

Colleges and universities are increasingly being tasked with responding to and supporting high risk students that face mental health challenges, homelessness, food insecurities, and academic and personal issues. To support these students, institutions have begun utilizing a case management model to offer wrap around care and resources. This training provides an extensive overview of the evolution of case management in the higher education setting including the foundations of the field, existing models and frameworks, and examples of how to implement case management practices. Presenters will explore examples of specific institutional policies as well as provide two interactive roundtables to give participants an opportunity to apply the material to their own campus and to a sample case study.

Institute Session D

De-Escalation for Professionals
Presented by Candice Johnston, Ed.D., Certified Emotional Intelligence Consultant; Associate Dean of Students, University of North Carolina Wilmington

By definition, de-escalate means to decrease or minimize size, scope, or intensity.  In short, the goal of de-escalation is to improve a situation or set of circumstances.  Whether it is working with an individual or with a group, mitigating risk and lowering the likelihood of a crisis is the goal.  By utilizing the principles of verbal de-escalation as outlined by Dr. George Thompson, understanding the concepts in Bar-On’s Model of emotional intelligence, and engaging in mental toughness as outlined by Dr. Michael J. Asken et al, it is possible to be highly effective in the practice of de-escalation.  How professionals perceive, approach, and respond to escalating situations and behaviors directly impact outcomes.  By utilizing key principles and skills reviewed in the workshop, professionals will be equipped to de-escalate a variety of complex situations. The session will focus on two areas. First, identifying and understanding relevant theoretical and concrete frameworks related to de-escalation.  Secondly, participants will practice implementing de-escalation skills within the context of realistic incidents.  In addition, participants will have the opportunity to process and discuss participants’ concerns, suggestions, and apprehensions regarding de-escalation.

Putting All the Pieces Together: From the First Referral of the Year to the Annual Report
Presented by Aaron “Chip” Reese, Ed.D., Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students, Columbus State University, NaBITA Past-President

This training will provide participants with clear guidance for best practices regarding management of the daily workload of the BIT, while also creating an annual report. Attendees will first receive hands-on experience with the De-Escalation Decision Tree (D2T) by way of a case study. The D2T provides a directed methodology for gathering data, applying a rubric for data analyzing, and then selecting appropriate interventions for persons of concern (POC). When administered properly, the D2T pulls all the pieces of a case together utilizing the NaBITA Threat Assessment Tool, SIVRA-35, and the VRAW2, while also assimilating the myriad of resources and information offered by institutional experts gathered around the BIT table. Secondly, participants will gain an understanding of how to utilize NaBITA’s CORE-Q10 Tool, Maxient’s quantitative data reports and a qualitative Likert-scale survey to produce an annual report, which will effectively integrate with their institution’s strategic plan and their BIT’s mission and goals.

Pre-Conference Sessions

Registration closed on Friday, November 3rd, 2017.

NaBITA will host one morning half-day pre-conference session and two afternoon half-day pre-conference sessions on Monday, November 13. Pre-con sessions are not included as part of your conference or Institute registration and require an additional payment. Conference or Institute registration is required in order to attend a pre-con session.

Pre-con Schedule at a Glance
Monday, November 13, 2017

9:00am – 12:00pm: Pre-conference 1: Understanding and Addressing Bias on Campus: Practical Techniques to Address and De-escalate Crisis 

1:00pm-4:00pm: Pre-conference 2: Radicalization Risk Rubric R3: An Exploration of the Risk Factors, Protective Factors and Underlying Motivations Related to Terrorism and Radicalization of College Students

1:00pm-4:00pm: Pre-conference 3: PASS: Preventing Another Student Suicide

Pre-Con Session Information

9:00am – 12:00pm
Pre-conference 1: Understanding and Addressing Bias on Campus: Practical Techniques to Address and De-escalate Crisis 

Presented by Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., Executive Director of NaBITA; Senior Executive Vice President for Professional Program Development, The NCHERM Group, LLC and Amy Murphy, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, Angelo State University

In the wake of the recent election, colleges and universities have seen an increase in bias-related incidents and race-, gender-, and sexual orientation-based incidents on campus, in the classroom, in the residence halls, and around the campus community. This pre-conference training provide an awareness of how issues of microaggressions, bias, and cultural competence impact the campus, along with some practical techniques to respond, de-escalate, and come together as a community.

Course Outline

  • Discussion of common biases with brief examples
    • Gender, gender identity, race/ethnicity, mental health (e.g., Autism Spectrum Disorder, personality disorders, and thought disorders), physical disabilities, and community members from different countries (e.g., international students)
  • Where does bias come from?
    • Past experience, including family and early childhood experiences, Institutional pressures, stereotypes, societal norms, politics, and religion
  • Mitigating bias in assessment
    • Awareness of potential bias, focus on process, the use of checklists, and procedures
    • Avoiding gut decisions and focusing on evidence
    • Developing the thirteenth man, a devil’s advocate thinking to check yourself
    • How power and authority are seen by the community
    • Ways to understand objectification, depersonalization, and misogyny
    • Practical applications of theory to adjust daily behaviors
  • Crisis management and de-escalation skills related to bias and microaggressions
    • Examples of crisis in the classroom, through protests, in conduct process
    • Applying change theory, harm reduction, and solution-focused approaches to intervention and management
    • Practical skill training on motivational interviewing techniques and avoiding traps

Learning Objectives

  1. Participants will develop and understanding of related to common areas of bias as it relates to gender, mental health, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, politics and religion
  2. Participants will discuss and mitigate the role of bias in assessment as it relates to threat and violence risk assessments
  3. Participants will review crisis de-escalation skills through case examples related to campus protests, the conduct process and classroom management

1:00pm – 4:00pm
Pre-conference 2: Radicalization Risk Rubric R3: An Exploration of the Risk Factors, Protective Factors and Underlying Motivations Related to Terrorism and Radicalization of College Students
Presented by Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., Executive Director of NaBITA; Senior Executive Vice President for Professional Program Development, The NCHERM Group, LLC and Amy Murphy, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, Angelo State University

Campus Behavioral Intervention and Threat Assessment Teams (BIT/TAT) have become increasingly concerned with how to identify the potential for radicalization of their students toward extremist violence. There have been several recent cases where a radicalized, extremist individual carried out a terrorist attack on a college campus and increasing incidents of hardened and fixated political ideologies leading to harmful debate, aggressive exchanges and potential violence. This program explores how to assess the risk of a college student becoming radicalized and moving forward with violent actions to a person, place or system. The presenters explore risk factors for radicalization, underlying motivations and the protective factors that reduce the potential for violence.

Course Outline

  • Introduction and Rationale for the R3
    • Case examples
    • Where the R3 fits with the NaBITA Tool, VRAW2 and SIVRA-35
    • Review of literature and other tools to address terrorism
  • Scoring the R3
    • Risk Factors for Radicalization
    • Protective Factors mitigating extremism and violence
    • Underlying ideologies and politics
  • Applying the R3
    • Case examples: religion, politics, animal rights, ethnicity

Learning Objectives

  1. Participants will review the need to monitor and assess radical and extremist behaviors on campus
  2. Participants will discuss risk factors and mitigating protective factors related to extremist violence
  3. Participants will explore how to use the R3 and how it fits within the other violence risk assessments tools NaBITA offers

Pre-conference 3: PASS: Preventing Another Student Suicide
Presented by David J. Denino, LPC, NCC, President-Elect of NaBITA; Director Emeritus, Counseling Services and Adjunct Professor/Clinical Mental Health at Southern Connecticut State University

Preventing Another Suicide (PASS) training is a 3-hour program that focuses on recognizing suicide warning signs, safety assessment and safety planning for students. As part of a comprehensive campus program to prevent suicide, PASS training can help those who have suicidal thoughts and other mental health issues. Suicide is the 2nd leading cause of death on campus, and all staff should become knowledgeable about suicide. PASS training provides an overview of suicide prevention as well as a more in depth review of depression and key protective factors and managing a suicidal person.

Why address these issues? Suicide IS preventable, and mental health issues can first appear in the college-age population. Also, the thoughts and behaviors of people that think about suicide have impact on our campus community.

Course Outline

  • Unit One
    • Overview of suicide/college data
    • Basic Terms
    • Understanding of risk factors, warning signs, and protective factors for suicide
  • Unit Two
    • Depression, Anxiety, Substance Abuse, Comorbidity (“along” with issues), Hopelessness
  • Unit Three
    • Methods of asking
    • Responding to
      • “yes” answers
      • “vague” answers
      • self-injurious behaviors
  • Unit Four
    • Intervention Protocol
      • Keeping person safe
      • Risk assessment
      • Low/Medium/High levels of concern
      • Referral to help
      • Specific suicide assessment instruments (non-clinical)
  • Unit Five
    • Self-care, take away card, suicide resources, reference materials
    • Final Q & A

Learning Objectives

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of suicide, including risk factors, warning signs
  2. Understand general symptomatic presentation
  3. Feel comfortable in “asking the question,” start the conversation
  4. Provide intervention
  5. Refer and follow-up

Pre-Con Registration Information

Cost per pre-conference session:

$280 per person for non-members
$249 per person for NaBITA members

Combo rate – register for both the morning session and one afternoon pre-con session and receive 20% off the total price, members and non-members: $448

You MUST have registered and paid for the pre-con session(s) in order to attend the pre-con session(s)This requires an additional payment from your Conference or Institute registration, regardless of your membership level.

Registration closed on Friday, November 3rd, 2017.

For information on the NaBITA Refund Policy, click here.

2017 NaBITA Annual Conference Registration

Registration closed on Friday, November 3rd, 2017.

Conference registration provides admittance to the conference November 13th to 15th, 2017, including an opening reception, continental breakfast, beverages and snacks. To see which meals are expected to be included in the conference registration fee, please click here. The meal inclusions are subject to change. The 2017 Conference website will be updated with any changes to reflect current inclusions. Admittance to the pre-conference sessions requires separate registration.
For information on the NaBITA Refund Policy, click here.

Registration Rates:

Conference Early Bird Registration (Register by Friday, September 8th, 2017)

  • Non-members — $529 per person
  • Individual/Case Manager NaBITA Members — $469 per person
  • Standard NaBITA Members — 1st Registrant $219; additional registrants — $469 per person
  • Enhanced NaBITA Members — 1st Registrant free; additional registrants — $409 per person

Conference Regular Registration (After September 8th, 2017)

  • Non-members — $629 per person
  • Individual/Case Manager NaBITA Members — $569 per person
  • Standard NaBITA Members — 1st Registrant $319; additional registrants — $569 per person
  • Enhanced NaBITA Members — 1st Registrant free; additional registrants — $509 per person

Registration closed on November 3rd, 2017.

Need a copy of NaBITA’s W-9? Download it here.
Registration questions? Please contact conference@nabita.org.
For information on the NaBITA Refund Policy, click here.

2017 NaBITA Campus Threat Management Institute Registration

Registration closed on Friday, November 3rd, 2017.

Institute registration provides admittance to the Conference on November 13–15, 2017, and Institute sessions from November 15–17, 2017.
For information on the NaBITA Refund Policy, click here.

Institute Registration Rates:

Conference and Campus Threat Management Institute Early Bird Registration
(Register by September 8th, 2017 )

  • Non–member Rate = $1,749.00
  • Individual/Case Manager Member Rate = $1,549.00
  • Standard Member rate: 1st person = $1,289.00, additional registrants= $1,549.00
  • Enhanced Member rate: 1st person = $980.00, additional registrants= $1,479.00
  • Group rate* (4 or more individuals from same institution): $1,153.00 per person

Conference and Campus Threat Management Institute Regular Registration (After September 8th, 2017 )

  • Non–member Rate = $1,849.00
  • Individual/Case Manager Member Rate = $1,649.00 per person
  • Standard Member rate: 1st person = $1,389.00, additional registrants = $1,649.00
  • Enhanced Member rate: 1st person = $1,080.00, additional registrants = $1,579.00
  • Group rate* (4 or more individuals from same institution): $1,238.00 per person

* Group rate is only available for Institute registrations.

Institute registration includes Conference registration.  Institute registration does not include pre-con registration.

Registration closed on Friday, November 3rd, 2017.

Need a copy of NaBITA’s W-9? Download it here.
Registration questions? Please contact info@nabita.org.
For information on the NaBITA Refund Policy, click here.

Scholarship Opportunity

In service to the field, NaBITA welcomes the submission of scholarship applications for the upcoming Annual NaBITA Conference.  These scholarships aim to assist our colleagues in their professional development and commitment to their chosen profession.

The applications deadline was August 1, 2017.

Awards

The NaBITA Conference Committee is excited to announce that it has developed two awards for best practice and research in the field of behavior intervention. The first is the Best Practices/Institutional Impact Award – to recognize a practice or program that can be modeled by other institutions as a best practice and has been shown to have significant evidence-based impact on the originating institution. The second award is Innovation in Research and Publication – to recognize research that is innovative in its topic, methodology, or program(s) studied. The research can be specific to the functioning of a BIT or programs that serve to educate, provide interventions for or reduce risk among target populations. Selected winners will be honored at the national conference, presented their award, and included or highlighted in The Journal of Campus Behavioral Intervention (J-BIT). The award nomination deadline was July 28, 2017. Thank you to everyone who submitted a nomination!

Best Practices/Institutional Impact Award

This award is intended to recognize a practice or program that can be modeled by other institutions as a best practice and has been shown to have significant evidence-based impact on the originating institution. These practices or programs can be those that are specific to the functioning of a BIT or which serve to educate, provide interventions for, or reduce risk among target populations.

Innovation in Research and Publication Award

This award is intended to recognize research that is innovative in its topic, methodology, or program(s) studied. The research can be specific to the functioning of a BIT or programs that serve to educate, provide interventions for or reduce risk among target populations.

Call For Programs

The Call For Programs deadline was July 28, 2017. NaBITA extends its thanks to those who submitted a program to review.

Do you have questions? Please read the 2017 NaBITA Annual Conference Concurrent Session FAQs.

Conference Sponsors & Exhibitors

Please click here to view the 2017 Conference Sponsorship & Exhibiting Opportunities brochure and application! This document outlines everything you need to know, including: background information on NaBITA, information about the event and attendee overview, as well as a full breakdown of all of the opportunities at this year’s event.

If you are interested in Conference Sponsorship and/or Exhibiting, please contact megan@nabita.org.

2017 NaBITA Annual Conference Sponsors and Exhibitors

 

 

 

CriticalArc

CriticalArc is a leading technology innovator, designing and developing the distributed command and control solution, SafeZone, a technology product provides real-time situational awareness in the field. SafeZone enhances safety and security by streamlining operations to provide the best incident outcomes, while safeguarding university reputations through preparedness against environmental and physical threats.


Maxient

 

 

 

Maxient LLC

As the nation’s foremost provider of student conduct administration software, Maxient offers a one-stop, completely customizable, web-based solution that fits college and university budgets in these tight economic times. In addition to increasing office productivity, Maxient’s Conduct Manager suite features tools specifically designed to assist behavioral intervention teams in connecting the dots. Founded by individuals who previously worked in student affairs, their experience in the field shows with a product that is highly functional and very intuitive.

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Higher Education Case Managers Association

HECMA is the preeminent organization for higher education case management professionals. We proudly represent over 500 higher education case managers in 43 states across the country and our membership grows daily. As the founding organization of higher education case managers, our mission is to provide members with a professional identity and resources to advance recommended practices, knowledge, and research in order to promote and enhance the well-being of our campus communities. 

ConcernCenter

ConcernCenter is a new tool that puts support in your student’s hands, literally! This mobile website, customizable to your institution and developed by a BIT leader, allows students to access resources on your campus based upon specific concerns.  Examples include, “I’m having trouble paying for textbooks”, “I’m failing classes”, “I’m not making friends”.  After selecting their concern, a list of primary and related offices on- and/or off-campus are presented.  Students can easily email each office from the application or use the GoogleMaps feature to get them to that particular department. Students have access to ConcernCenter 24/7/365.

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The NCHERM Group, LLC

The NCHERM Group is  a law and consulting practice dedicated to best practices for campus health and safety. The NCHERM Group is a repository for systems-level approaches and models that will enhance and advance your campus risk management and preventive law efforts. The NCHEMR Group emphasizes best practices for policy, training, and education programming as proactive risk management. The NCHEMR Group specializes in advancing culture change strategies and problem-solving for the tough wellness, compliance, and liability issues colleges and universities face today. When you engage our services, you benefit from the collective wisdom, experience and constant collaboration of our more than 25 consultants.

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Association of Title IX Administrators

ATIXA provides a professional association for school and college Title IX Coordinators and administrators who are interested in serving their districts and campuses more effectively. Since 1972, Title IX has proved to be an increasingly powerful leveling tool, helping to advance gender equity in schools and colleges.

SCOPE logo
School and College Organization for Prevention Educators

SCOPE is a resource for prevention educators and professionals addressing prevention holistically across many areas of health and risk. SCOPE embraces an ecological, inclusive, holistic, feminist, public health, evidence-based, and multi-disciplinary vision of prevention. To effectively promote the aims of the prevention community, SCOPE deeply examines the causes of violence, health and safety risks within society – including hate, intolerance, apathy, gender bias, racism, homophobia, stigmatization of mental health, objectification of the human body, ignorance, predation and discrimination – to foster effective, interconnected, strategic prevention.

Hotel

The 2017 NaBITA Conference and Campus Threat Management Institute will be held at the Westin Riverwalk, San Antonio.

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NaBITA has blocked rooms at the conference hotel, The Westin Riverwalk, San Antonio. The NaBITA discounted room block is now closed.

420 W Market Street
San Antonio, TX 78205
888-627-8396

Block rate per night (evenings of November 11th to November 18th)

Single Double
Run of House  199.00  199.00

Click here to make your reservations online.

Please note that the room block prices exclude the tax of 16.75%.

The conference room block closed on October 19th. Reservations made after October 19th will be subject to the going rate and based on availability. Please make your reservations early.

Reservations made through a 3rd party service or website (Expedia, Travelocity, etc) are outside of the room block and are not subject to any benefits or commissions afforded to the block.

Airport and Ground Transportation

AIRPORT

The San Antonio International Airport (SAT) is a 15-minute ride from the Westin. For more information, please visit http://www.sanantonio.gov/sat.

LOCAL TRANSPORTATION

Advantage Rent A Car is offering NaBITA attendees an additional 10% savings through its website at http://www2.advantage.com, by calling our toll free reservation line at 800-777-5500 or by clicking here. Please refer to discount code CD036E6EFF. Rates are valid at any Advantage Texas location.


Please click here to see NaBITA’s Response to the California Ban on Travel to Texas

Guests With Special Needs

For attendees that require ADA accommodations or meal accommodations based on medical or religious requirements, please contact conference@nabita.org.

Refund Policy

NaBITA understands that circumstances change and events may arise that prohibit your ability to attend an event after you have registered. NaBITA will allow another individual from your institution to attend in your place OR you may attend a future NaBITA event with an equivalent registration rate. If you do not wish to send someone in your place or attend a future training event, your registration will only be refunded based on the schedule below.

Registration cancellation by July 8, 2017 = 100% refund

Registration cancellation by August 5, 2017 = 75% refund

Registration cancellation by September 2, 2017 = 50% refund

Registration cancellation by September 30, 2017 = 25% refund

Registration cancellation after September 30, 2017 = no refunds

For more information on the NaBITA Annual Conference and Campus Threat Management Institute, please contact conference@nabita.org, or via phone, at 484-321-3651.